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Lightweight Design worldwide

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 42–47 | Cite as

Additively manufactured hood hinges

  • Martin Hillebrecht
  • Eric Klemp
  • Patrick Mehmert
  • Sebastian Flügel
Design Hood Hinge
  • 188 Downloads

Edag, voestalpine and Simufact have developed an additively manufactured engine hood hinge. As well as being half the weight of conventional designs, it also incorporates a pedestrian protection function. The component can be manufactured without tools, is optimized for warp and requires only minimum post-processing.

Compact and Sports Car Segments

Stringent safety and functionality demands imposed on active hinge systems for engine hoods mean they are very complex, Figure 1 (right). In the event of an accident with a pedestrian, they extend the distance between the impacting object and any hard engine components by raising the engine hood. A pyrotechnically triggered actuator kicks in within fractions of a second and raises the hood. These hinge systems can be manufactured from sheet metal or cast or forged for large-scale production series in excess of 30,000 units p.a. [ 1]. The complex kinematics involved require many individual parts (approx. 40 components per vehicle) and high...

Notes

Thanks

The authors would like to thank the entire interdisciplinary team for their close cooperation: Edag Engineering: Martin Rüde, Team Leader BE Sindelfingen; Fabian Baum, Development Engineer BE Sindelfingen; Fabian Möller, Calculation Engineer CAE Sindelfingen; Julia Schäfer-Koch, Department Head Testing Böblingen; Reinhard Bolz, Head of Measurements.

voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center: Jens Christoffel. Simufact Engineering GmbH: Michael Wohlmuth, Dr. Hendrik Schafstall, Volker Mensing.

A special thank you also to Hirtenberger as an associate partner for providing the pyrotechnic equipment: Horst Weinkopf, Director Research and Development; Kurt Aigner, Product Pre-Development.

References

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    Hillebrecht, M.: LightHinge+: Engineering und Herstellung eines ultraleichten Motorhauben-Scharniers. Fachvortrag auf formnext Messe, VDMA Stage, Frankfurt, November 14, 2017Google Scholar
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    Leupold / Glosser: 3D Printing: Recht, Wirtschaft und Technik des industriellen 3D-Drucks, C. H. Beck, 2017Google Scholar
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    Mattheck, C.: Die Körpersprache der Bauteile: Enzyklopädie der Formfindung nach der Natur. Karlsruhe: Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, 2017Google Scholar
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    Mehmert, P., Escobar, E., Tateishi, M.: Optimization of the AM Process Chain by Scalable Practice Orientated Simulation. Conference NAFEMS Seminar: Virtual and Real, Wiesbaden 2017Google Scholar
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    Mehmert, P.; Escobar, E.; Tateishi, M.: Simulation Mehmert, P.; Escobar, E.; Tateishi, M.: Simulation of the Additive Manufacturing Process Chain for Metals. In: Kynast, M.; Eichmann, E.; Witt, G. (eds.): Rapid.Tech — International Trade Show & Conference for Additive Manufacturing: Proceedings of the 14th Rapid.Tech Conference Erfurt, 20.-22.6.2017. Munich: Carl Hanser, 2017, S. 185-201Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Hillebrecht
    • 1
  • Eric Klemp
    • 2
  • Patrick Mehmert
    • 3
  • Sebastian Flügel
    • 1
  1. 1.Edag Engineering GmbHFuldaGermany
  2. 2.voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbHDüsseldorfGermany
  3. 3.Simufact Engineering GmbHHamburgGermany

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