Advertisement

Lightweight Design worldwide

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 20–23 | Cite as

Modelling of Continuous Damage in Composite Structural Components

  • Michael Hack
Materials Damage Modelling
  • 185 Downloads

The use of composite materials for structural components in vehicles imposes new requirements on testing, production and simulation. Combining various materials, fibre topologies and manufacturing methods results in numerous influences that need to be considered in simulation. Siemens PLM Software demonstrates how to produce lightweight components with optimum properties.

The need for lightweight construction methods in vehicle engineering has led to the fact that composite materials are also used for load-bearing structural parts. These are exposed to various strains while in use on the road and often subject to continuous damage. This raises then the issue of their fatigue strength.

Previously, damage modelling for composite materials tended to concentrate on aircraft construction, where long test series are possible and where only a limited number of selected materials and simplified load scenarios need to be considered. The vehicle industry, however, adds additional challenges in...

Keywords

Composite Material Fatigue Strength Stress Cycle Stiffness Reduction Local Stiffness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. [1]
    Küssner, M. E. N.: Simcenter for the predictive validation of composite materials. Simulation von Composites’ Bereit für Industrie 4.0? Hamburg, NAFEMS DACH, 2016Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    v. Paepegem, W.: Fatigue Damage Modelling with the phenomenological residual stiffnes approach. In: Vassilopoulos, A.: Fatigue Life Prediction of Composites and Composite Structures. 2010, pp. 102–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Ladevèze, E.; Le Dantec, P.;: Damage modelling of the elementary ply for laminated composites. Composite Science and Technology, 43,1992, pp. 252–267CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    M3, S., 2014, M3 - SIM-Flanders. Retrieved from SIM-Fladers: www.sim-flanders.be/research-program/m3
  5. [5]
    Jain, A.; v. Paepegem, W.; Verpoest, I.; Lomov, S.: A feasibility study of the Master SN curve approach for short fiber reinforced composites. I Journal of Fatigue, 2016, pp. 264–274Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Brokate, M.; Sprekels, J.: Hysteresis operators. 1996, New York, SpringerCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Carrella-Payan, D.; Magneville, B.; Hack, M.; Naito, T.; Urushiyama, Y.; Yamazaki, T.; v. Paepegem, W.: Implementation of fatigue model for unidirectional laminate based on finite element analysis: theory and practice. In: Frattura ed Integrita? Strutturale 38, 2016, pp. 184–190Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    v. Paepegem, W.: Development and finite element implementation of a damage. PhD Thesis, 2002, U GentGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Bruyneel, M.; Delsemme, P.; Groupil, A.; Jetteur, J.; Lequesne, C.; Naito, T.; Urushiyama, Y.: Damage modeling of laminated composites: validation of the inter-laminar damage law in SAMCEF at the coupon level for UD plies. World Congress of Comp Mechanics, 2014, BarcelonaGoogle Scholar
  10. [10]
    Bruyneel, M.; Delsemme, P.; Groupil, A.; Jetteur, J.; Lequesne, C.; Naito, T.; Urushiyama, Y.: Damage modeling of laminated composites: validation of the intra-laminar damage law in SAMCEF at the coupon level for UD plies. European Conference on Composite Material ECCM16, 2014, SevillaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Hack
    • 1
  1. 1.Siemens Industry Software GmbHKaiserslauternGermany

Personalised recommendations