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International Journal of Environmental Research

, Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 951–959 | Cite as

Removal of formaldehyde from the air with a suspended growth bioreactor

  • Ru Wang
  • Xuemei Li
  • Yong Feng
  • Faheem Tariq
  • Kunzhi Li
  • Yulin Wei
  • Jianhua Chen
  • Ciqing Jiang
  • Limei Tian
  • Yongqin Geng
  • Enming Miao
  • Chengming ZhangEmail author
  • Limei Chen
Research paper
  • 49 Downloads

Abstract

In the present study, the root zone of Canna flaccida Salisb. was selected as the biological component. We found that the adsorption rate of formaldehyde (FA) by C. flaccida was initially low, before increasing substantially. 13CNMR analysis indicated that C. flaccida can metabolize H13CHO and the major metabolic products were organic acid and amino acids. On this basis, we had designed a suspended growth bioreactor (SGB) to remove FA. An SGB was tested under a series of different conditions and the results showed that FA removal efficiency was strongly influenced by water volume, root zone weight, and gas flow rate. More than 52% of the FA was removed in 1 h and the maximum elimination capacity reached 35.112 mg m−3 h−1. After 24 h, no FA remained in the SGB. Running for 15 days, the concentration of FA in the lab space decreased from 1.12 to 0.82 mg m−3, and the concentration of FA in the SGB reached a low level. These results confirmed that SGB is an effective way to remove FA.

Article Highlights

  • Kinetics of FA uptake by Canna roots in FA solutions was established.

  • Canna roots could metabolize FA was confirmed.

  • FA removal efficiency significantly affected by a series of different conditions.

  • The performance evaluation of the SGB in short- term and long-term treatment.

Keywords

Formaldehyde (FA) Suspended growth bioreactor (SGB) Metabolic mechanism C. flaccida Biological degradation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the Foundation of the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB138701) and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31260063). Useful suggestions given by Xiao Suqin of Yunnan Provincial Academy of Agricultural Sciences are also acknowledged.

Supplementary material

41742_2019_228_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (28.4 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PPTX 29055 kb)

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Copyright information

© University of Tehran 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ru Wang
    • 1
  • Xuemei Li
    • 1
  • Yong Feng
    • 2
  • Faheem Tariq
    • 3
  • Kunzhi Li
    • 2
  • Yulin Wei
    • 1
  • Jianhua Chen
    • 1
  • Ciqing Jiang
    • 1
  • Limei Tian
    • 1
  • Yongqin Geng
    • 1
  • Enming Miao
    • 1
  • Chengming Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Limei Chen
    • 2
  1. 1.Cigarette Product Quality Test CenterTechnology Center of China Tobacco Yunnan Industrial Co., LtdKunmingChina
  2. 2.Faculty of Life Science and Biotechnology, Chenggong CampusKunming University of Science and TechnologyKunmingChina
  3. 3.Department of BotanyIslamia CollegePeshawarPakistan

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