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Historical Archaeology

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 41–55 | Cite as

Disrupted Identities and Frontier Forts: Enlisted Men and Officers at Fort Lane, Oregon Territory, 1853–1856

  • Mark Axel TveskovEmail author
  • Chelsea Rose
Original Article
  • 65 Downloads

Abstract

Frontiers are contingent and dynamic arenas for the negotiation, entrenchment, and innovation of identity, and the imposing materiality of frontier fortifications and their prominence in colonial topographies make them ideal laboratories in which to examine this dynamic. This article presents the results of large-scale excavations in 2011 and 2012 at the officers’ quarters and enlisted men's barracks at Fort Lane, a U.S. Army outpost used during the Rogue River Wars in southern Oregon between 1853 and 1856. We consider how, within this arena, the identities of social class, Confederate or Union, and East Coaster or frontiersman, were crafted in this pre–Civil War frontier setting at the dawn of the modern era.

Keywords

conflict archaeology Oregon settler colonialism fort dragoons 

Extracto

Las fronteras son arenas variables y dinámicas para la negociación, el arraigo y la innovación de la identidad, y la imponente materialidad de las fortificaciones fronterizas y su prominencia en las topografías coloniales las hacen laboratorios ideales para examinar esta dinámica. Este artículo presenta los resultados de excavaciones a gran escala en 2011 y 2012 en las habitaciones de los oficiales y los cuarteles de los soldados rasos en Fort Lane, un puesto fronterizo del ejército de los Estados Unidos que se utilizó durante las guerras de Rogue River en el sur de Oregón entre los años 1853 y 1856. Consideramos cómo, dentro de este escenario, las identidades de clase social—de los Estados Confederados o de la Unión, de los originarios de la costa oriental o de los hombres de la frontera—se formaban en este escenario fronterizo antes de la guerra civil en los albores de la era moderna.

Résumé

Les fronts pionniers sont des scènes conditionnelles et dynamiques de négociation, d’enracinement et d’innovation de l’identité, et la matérialité imposante des fortifications desdits fronts et leur importance dans les paysages coloniaux en font des laboratoires idéaux où examiner cette dynamique. Le présent article traite des résultats des grandes excavations de 2011 et 2012 des quartiers des officiers et des casernes des gradés et hommes de troupe de Fort Lane, un poste avancé de l’armée américaine utilisé durant la Guerre des Rogue River au sud de l’Oregon, de 1853 à 1856. Nous considérons comment, sur cette scène, les identités de classe sociale, confédéré ou unioniste et côtier oriental ou pionnier, furent sculptées dans ce contexte précédant la Guerre civile et à l’aube de l’ère moderne.

Notes

Acknowledgments:

The authors would like to thank the many participants and supporters of the Fort Lane Archaeology Project and this thematic collection for Historical Archaeology, particularly Sigrid Arnott, Charles Cobb, Amy Cohen, Justin Eichelberger, Don Ivy, Katie Johnson, Robert Kentta, Kent Lightfoot, Sharla Luxton, Kendal McDonald, Chris Matthews, Nancy Nelson, Joanne Preston, Zach Rodriguez, Roger Roberts, Karen Smith, Ben Truwe, and Doug Wilson. We are also appreciative of all the issue authors, as well as the participants in the fort symposia at the Society for Historical Archaeology meetings in 2015 and 2016. The Fort Lane Archaeological Project was funded by grants and contracts through the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

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Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Southern Oregon University Laboratory of AnthropologySouthern Oregon UniversityAshlandU.S.A.

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