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Energetic particles’ fluxes and dose in the Radiation Gene Box measured by space radiation detector onboard SJ-10 satellite

  • Xingzhu CuiEmail author
  • Yaqing Liu
  • Wenxi Peng
  • Jinzhou Wang
  • Min Gao
  • Dongya Guo
  • Xiaohua Liang
  • Ruirui Fan
  • Huanyu Wang
  • Yunlong Zhang
  • Zhongjian Ma
  • Mingyang Yan
  • Hong Xiao
  • Yuanda Jiang
  • Haiying Hang
Original Paper
  • 260 Downloads

Abstract

Background

To evaluate the hazard of space radiation posing to the tissues, it is important to obtain exact fluxes of different radiation particles. The Radiation Gene Box (RGB) onboard SJ-10 spacecraft was an instrument designed to investigate the effects of space environment on the mESCs and drosophila. To derive the dose received by the tissues inside the RGB, the Space Radiation Detector (SRD) was installed inside it.

Purpose

The SRD was designed to derive the fluxes of electron, proton, hellion and gamma rays around it. If the type of the particles, the energies, the fluxes and the conversion coefficients are known, the dose received by the tissues could be evaluated.

Methods

The SRD was designed as a ΔE-E solid-state telescope. By measuring the energy deposited in the three subdetectors, the particles’ type and their energies could be discriminated. The data of SRD were divided into 15 bins by the types of particles and their energy ranges.

Results

The gamma ray flux was higher than any other particle flux inside the RGB, and the electron was the most intense charge particle, while the helium ion was the most harmful radiation to the cells inside the RGB.

Conclusion

The dose rate inside the Radiation Gene Box was much higher than in the ground, but the integral dose of 12 days inside the RGB was about 2.13 mSv. It seemed unlikely to have obvious biological effects on the tissues of mice and drosophila.

Keywords

Particles’ flux Dose Radiation detector Geomagnetic field 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are deeply grateful to the National Space Science Center, CAS for their contribution in obtaining valuable data. We also acknowledge the support of the China Academy of Space Technology for the wonderful platform that they provided. This work is supported by the strategic priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Science, Grant No. XDA04020202-13.

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Copyright information

© Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Nuclear Electronics and Nuclear Detection Society and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xingzhu Cui
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yaqing Liu
    • 1
  • Wenxi Peng
    • 1
  • Jinzhou Wang
    • 1
  • Min Gao
    • 1
  • Dongya Guo
    • 1
  • Xiaohua Liang
    • 1
  • Ruirui Fan
    • 1
  • Huanyu Wang
    • 1
  • Yunlong Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhongjian Ma
    • 1
  • Mingyang Yan
    • 1
  • Hong Xiao
    • 3
  • Yuanda Jiang
    • 4
  • Haiying Hang
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute of High Energy PhysicsCAS‎BeijingChina
  2. 2.College of PhysicsJilin UniversityChangchunChina
  3. 3.Changzhou Institute of TechnologyChangzhouChina
  4. 4.National Space Science CenterCAS‎BeijingChina
  5. 5.Institute of BiophysicsCAS‎BeijingChina

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