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Performance Evaluation of a Combined Heat and Power System with Stirling Engine for Residential Applications

  • Mohammad Sheykhi
  • Mahmood ChahartaghiEmail author
  • Seyed Majid Hashemian
Research Paper
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

A combined heating and power (CHP) system with a Stirling engine for building applications has been proposed in the present work. The use of these systems in building applications will be more common if they have significant advantages from the viewpoints of the pollution emission and operational cost in comparison with the other similar systems. The Stirling engine was modeled with consideration of different losses of its components. In addition, the effect of Stirling engine speed on efficiency, carbon dioxide emission, annual tax on carbon dioxide emissions and operational cost was analyzed. The results showed that the CHP system at low rotational speeds had better performance than other rotational speeds. Furthermore, the CHP system could achieve 900 $ reduction in annual costs of CO2 tax compared to the conventional system during operation.

Keywords

CHP Stirling engine Non-ideal adiabatic Rotational speed 

List of Symbols

General

A

Cross-sectional area (m2)

Acond

Conductive area (m2)

a

Coefficient for finite speed thermodynamic (−)

CO2T

Carbon dioxide tax ($)

CR

Operational cost reduction (−)

c

Average speed of molecules (m s−1)

cp

Specific heat at constant pressure (Jkg−1 K−1)

cv

Specific heat at constant volume (Jkg−1 K−1)

D

Hydraulic diameter (m)

dd

Diameter of displacer (m)

f

Friction factor

fr

Rotation frequency of engine (HZ)

G

Working gas mass flow

h

Convective heat transfer coefficient of gas

J

Gap between displacer and cylinder (m)

kg

Thermal conductivity of working gas (W m−1 K−1)

kr

Thermal conductivity of regenerator wall (W m−1 K−1)

Ld

Displacer length (m)

Lr

Regenerator length (m)

M

Mass of the working fluid (kg)

NTU

Number of the transfer units (−)

nr

Engine rotational speed (rpm)

P

Power output (W)

Pr

Prandtl number (−)

p

Pressure (Pa)

Q

Heat transfer (W)

R

Gas constant (J kg−1 K−1)

Re

Reynolds number (−)

S

Displacer stroke (m)

St

Staunton number

T

Temperature (K)

CO2ER

CO2 emission reduction (−)

V

Volume (m3)

W

Work output (J)

w

Piston velocity (m s−1)

Greek

θ

Crank angle (deg)

μ

Dynamic viscosity (kg m−1 s−1)

ɛ

Effectiveness (−)

η

Efficiency (−)

γ

Specific heat ratio (cp · c v −1 ) (−)

Subscript

ac

Actual

adi

Ideal adiabatic

c

Compression space

ck

Cooler–compression space interface

e

Expansion space

gen

Generator

gh

Inside of heater

gk

Inside of cooler

h

Heater

he

Heater–expansion space interface

k

Cooler

kr

Cooler–regenerator interface

r

Regenerator

rh

Regenerator–heater interface

sh

Shuttle effect

wh

Heater wall

wk

Cooler wall

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Copyright information

© Shiraz University 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringShahrood University of TechnologyShahroodIran

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