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A Rare Case of Meigs Syndrome in Pregnancy

  • Sharayu MirjiEmail author
  • Ava Desai
  • Bijal Patel
  • Shilpa Patel
  • Priti Rajpurohit
Case Report
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To report a rare case of Meigs syndrome in pregnancy. Meigs syndrome is a triad of benign ovarian tumor with ascites and pleural effusion. It typically resolves after resection of the tumor. Fibroma is the most common ovarian tumor associated with Meigs syndrome. It is a rare cause of ascites, and its occurrence in pregnancy is even rarer. Meigs syndrome is more common in postmenopausal women with an average age of 50 years. We report a rare case of Meigs syndrome with elevated CA 125 levels detected in a young woman with midtrimester pregnancy. Our patient presented to us at 17 weeks of gestation with a large adnexal mass with rapidly growing ascites and pleural effusion with high CA 125 levels presenting a diagnostic dilemma. Biopsy revealed it to be a fibroma, and she was managed surgically with a unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.

Conclusion

This case is reported because of the rarity of Meigs syndrome complicating a precious pregnancy in a young woman. It requires appropriate management of the ovarian tumor along with measures for safeguarding the pregnancy.

Keywords

Meigs syndrome Fibroma Ovarian mass in pregnancy 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

Institutional review committee approval was obtained.

Human and animal participants

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Association of Gynecologic Oncologists of India 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharayu Mirji
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ava Desai
    • 1
  • Bijal Patel
    • 1
  • Shilpa Patel
    • 1
  • Priti Rajpurohit
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gynecologic OncologyGujarat Cancer and Research InstituteAhmedabadIndia

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