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Postmenopausal Woman with Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor and Associated Mucinous Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature

  • Archana LakshmananEmail author
  • Ann Kurian
  • Kumar Gubbala
Case Report
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Abstract

Germ cell tumors account for 2–3% of ovarian malignancies. They typically occur in young females and have been rarely documented in postmenopausal women. Their rarity in postmenopausal women along with the histologic variability of yolk sac tumors, sometimes mimicking somatic malignancies, may pose a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of ovarian yolk sac tumor with associated mucinous carcinoma in a postmenopausal woman. They have been reported to behave aggressively and are less responsive to chemotherapy.

Keywords

Yolk sac tumor Mucinous Adenocarcinoma Postmenopausal 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Association of Gynecologic Oncologists of India 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of HistopathologyApollo Cancer InstituteTeynampet, ChennaiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Gynaecological OncologyApollo Cancer InstituteTeynampet, ChennaiIndia

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