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Experimental Techniques

, Volume 43, Issue 6, pp 645–655 | Cite as

Experimental Study of Stationary-Head/Channel Cover STHE Prototype Using ε-NTU Method

  • H. TanujayaEmail author
  • I.W. Sukania
Article
  • 72 Downloads

Abstract

Our research focuses on the performance evaluation of the small shell-and-tube heat exchanger (STHE) – laboratory type. The experiment used the prototype design of stationary-head/channel cover using the ring rubber, which separate the hot and cold fluid in a chamber. The stationary-head prototypes unusually are designed using low cost manufacture and simple construction, without bolt or nut to join both the stationary-head and shell. The shell has four holes to supply hot/cold fluid, and next to the tube-sheet hole to supply cold/hot fluid, the position both of them are inside the stationary-head. The single and double segmental baffles were used in this study. Calculation of thermal performance and effectiveness of STHE were calculated based on ε-NTU method. The correlation of heat transfer proposed was based on the unique construction of stationary-head design for the effectiveness of STHE. The data were collected from the both single and double segmental baffles, which were investigated by varying flow rate. The investigation including Reynolds and Nusselt number, heat transfer coefficient, and pressure drop which all effects of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger effectiveness. The results show that the ratio of the actual heat transfers for single segmental was higher than double segmental and the average effectiveness of single segmental baffle was 10 to 30% less than the double segmental baffles.

Keywords

Heat exchanger STHE Baffle NTU Stationary-head 

Nomenclature

Nutube

Nusselt Number of tube

Nushell

Nusselt Number of shell

dinTube

Inner diameter of tube

dOut Tube

Outer diameter of tube

LTube

Length of tube

NTube

Number of tube

ReTube

Reynolds number of tube

ReShell Max

Reynolds number Max of shell

PrTube

Prandtl number of tube

PrShell

Prandtl number of shell

PrWall

Prandtl number of wall

Ch

Specific heat capacity of hot fluid

Cc

Specific heat capacity of cold fluid

CMin

Minimum heat capacity rate

CMax

Maximum heat capacity rate

CR

Heat capacity rate ratio

\( \dot{m} \)

Mass flow rate

\( \dot{Q} \)

Actual heat transfer rate

\( \dot{Q} \)Max

Maximum possible heat transfer rate

UTotal

Total of heat transfer coefficient

A

Area

ATotal

Total area

AIn Tube

Area of inner tube

AOut Tube

Area of outer tube

Rth

Thermal energy total

RDin Tube

Thermal energy of inner tube

RDOut Tube

Thermal energy of outer tube

NTU

Number Transfer Unit

Thin

Temperature of inlet hot fluid

Thout

Temperature of outlet hot fluid

Tcin

Temperature of inlet cold fluid

Tcout

Temperature of outlet cold fluid

hh

Heat transfer coefficient of hot fluid

hc

Heat transfer coefficient of cold fluid

k

Thermal conductivity

hIn

Heat transfer coefficient of inlet fluid

hOut

Heat transfer coefficient of outlet fluid

DIn

Inner diameter

DOut

Outer diameter

ε

Effectiveness

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work supported by Research program of Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia and DPPM Universitas Tarumanagara, Indonesia. The authors wish to thank all of the participating personnels for their help, support and suggestions.

Supplementary material

40799_2019_322_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (797 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 796 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringUniversitas TarumanagaraJakartaIndonesia
  2. 2.Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringUniversitas TarumanagaraJakartaIndonesia

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