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Influence of the Material Composition on the Environmental Impact of Ceramic Glasses

  • Patricia Gómez
  • Daniel ElduqueEmail author
  • Isabel Clavería
  • Carmelo Pina
  • Carlos Javierre
Regular Paper
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

An exhaustive study of the influence of ceramic glass material composition on the environmental impact has been performed. In order to perform a more accurate calculation of the environmental impact a life cycle assessment (LCA) was implemented using real material composition of ceramic glasses. Employing a sequential X-rays Fluorescence spectrometer, the composition of several ceramic glasses were analyzed, as this information is not published by the manufacturers. The environmental impact results of each ceramic glass were surveyed using EcoInvent v3.4 data, and SimaPro 8.4 software, following ReCiPe Endpoint and Carbon Footprint methodologies. The importance of considering the composition on the LCA is shown, establishing significant differences among the analyzed glasses. Few variations in the quantity of material composition generate high differences on the environmental impact values, demonstrating the high influence of the material composition on the environmental impact. Elements such as tin, lithium, and titanium are the ones that generate the highest contribution on the environmental impact. In contrast, silica sand shows the lowest impact in both methodologies despite it supposes between 58% and 63% of their compositions. Others such as barite and magnesium, together with neodymium emerged in the composition of the studied ceramic glasses as they are considered Critical Raw Materials by the European Union, due to their supply risk and economic importance.

Keywords

Ceramic glass Environmental impact Life cycle assessment Material composition 

Abbreviations

EoL

End of Life

ErP

Energy-related products

EU

European Union

EuP

Energy-using products

GWP

Global warming potential

IPCC

Intergovernmental panel on climate change

ISO

International Organization for Standardization

LCA

Life cycle assessment

LREE

Light rare earth element

REACH

Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of CHemicals

REEs

Rare earth elements

RMA

Raw material acquisition

RoHS

Restriction of hazardous substances

Notes

Acknowledgements

The study presented in this paper has been partially supported by the Spanish MINECO under Project RETO RTC-2014-1847-6, and has been performed by members of the I + AITIIP (DGA-T08_17R) research group of the FEDER 2014–2020 “Construyendo Europa desde Aragón” program, recognized by the Regional Government of Aragon.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Precision Engineering 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BSH Electrodomésticos España, S.AZaragozaSpain
  2. 2.i + aitiip, Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Zaragoza, C/María de Luna, 3ZaragozaSpain

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