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Cost Savings and Clinical Interventions Made by PharmD Students During APPE Rotations at Federally Qualified Health Centers

  • Jacqueline Tualla
  • Cynthia Koh-Knox
  • Brian SheplerEmail author
Short Communication
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Abstract

PharmD students make significant clinical interventions during their last year of training in clinical rotations at a variety of practice sites. These interventions ranged from performing dosage adjustments to preventing adverse drug reactions and saved $92,803 dollars in the Federally Qualified Health Center practice sites that were included in this study over a 1-year period of time. The following study examines the types of interventions made and their associated cost savings.

Keywords

Pharmacy Cost-saving PharmD Rotations 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval and Informed Consent

NA

As stated above in the “Methods” section, the university’s institutional review board determined this study to be exempt.

References

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Copyright information

© International Association of Medical Science Educators 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Tualla
    • 1
  • Cynthia Koh-Knox
    • 1
  • Brian Shepler
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Purdue University College of PharmacyWest LafayetteUSA

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