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A Comparison of Video Modeling and Video Prompting by Adolescents with ASD

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Abstract

Video-based instruction has been effective in teaching a range of skills, including functional living skills, to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Few studies have compared the efficacy and efficiency across video modality—specifically, comparing video modeling to video prompting. Consequently, practitioners have little empirical guidance when selecting between procedural variations of video-based instruction. Using an adaptive alternating-treatments design with a baseline, we evaluated the comparative effectiveness of point-of-view video modeling and video prompting on the percentage of meal preparation tasks completed correctly and on-task behavior with 4 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. We found video modeling to be effective and efficient in the acquisition of meal preparation skills across 3 of the 4 participants. Across participants, video prompting resulted in more errors than video modeling did. Skills generalized to an untrained location and were maintained at a 3-week follow-up. Stakeholders reported procedures, goals, and outcomes as socially valid.

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Correspondence to Ruth M. DeBar.

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Thomas, E.M., DeBar, R.M., Vladescu, J.C. et al. A Comparison of Video Modeling and Video Prompting by Adolescents with ASD. Behav Analysis Practice (2020) doi:10.1007/s40617-019-00402-0

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Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Adolescents
  • Functional living skills
  • Video modeling
  • Video prompting