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On the Standardization of the Functional Analysis

  • Joshua JesselEmail author
  • Gregory P. Hanley
  • Mahshid Ghaemmaghami
Discussion and Review Paper
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

The functional analysis procedures described in the seminal Iwata et al. (1982/1994) study are prominent in the applied behavior analytic literature, having been replicated hundreds of times over the past 30 years (Beavers, Iwata, & Lerman, 2013; Hanley, McCord, Iwata, 2003). However, the extent to which particular components of this functional analysis model have become more or less prominent over time is not clear from these literature reviews. We therefore conducted a review of the functional analysis literature between the years of 1965 and 2016 to determine the trends in the usage of particular components over time and to determine if the published literature reflects a standardization of the manner in which functional analyses of problem behavior are conducted. Furthermore, we discuss whether or not this standardization of a functional analysis model is currently necessary.

Keywords

Functional analysis Problem behavior Procedural components Standard 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Joshua Jessel declares that he has no conflict of interest. Gregory P. Hanley declares that he has no conflict of interest. Mahshid Ghaemmaghami declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

For this type of study formal consent is not required.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua Jessel
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gregory P. Hanley
    • 2
  • Mahshid Ghaemmaghami
    • 3
  1. 1.Queens CollegeQueensUSA
  2. 2.Western New England UniversitySpringfieldUSA
  3. 3.University of the PacificStocktonUSA

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