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Comparison of Selected Sociodemographic Characteristics and Sexual Risk Behaviors of Black/African American Men Who Have Sex with Men Only and Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women, Southeastern United States, 2013–2016

  • Malendie T. GainesEmail author
  • Donna Hubbard McCree
  • Zaneta Gaul
  • Kirk D. Henny
  • DeMarc A. Hickson
  • Madeline Y. Sutton
Article

Abstract

Purpose

Compare selected sociodemographic and sexual risk characteristics of black/African American (black) men who have sex with men only (MSMO) and men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) in the southeastern United States (the South).

Methods

We conducted bivariate and multivariable analyses to explore the sociodemographic characteristics and sexual risk behaviors of 584 MSMW and MSMO in the South.

Results

MSMW had lesser odds of having a college or graduate degree (aOR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.54) and having > 2 male oral sex partners (aOR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.48) compared to MSMO. MSMW had greater odds of being homeless (aOR = 3.11; 95% CI = 1.80, 5.38) and selecting “top” sexual position (aOR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.72) compared to MSMO.

Conclusion

MSMW in the South experience social and structural factors that may affect their risk for HIV infection. Strategies to address these factors should be considered in prevention and care efforts for this population.

Keywords

African American Black Men who have sex with men and women Men who have sex with men only HIV risk Southern United States 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the participating men in Jackson, MS and Atlanta, GA.

Funding Information

This work was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [grant number PS003315].

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Disclaimer

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Copyright information

© W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oak Ridge Institute for Science and EducationOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.Division of HIV/AIDS PreventionNational Centers for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaGeorgia
  3. 3.ICF, 3 Corporate Square NEAtlantaGeorgia
  4. 4.My Brothers’ KeeperJacksonUSA
  5. 5.Us Helping Us, Inc.WashingtonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyMorehouse School of MedicineAtlantaGeorgia

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