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Perspectives on Behavior Science

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 283–301 | Cite as

A Review of SAFMEDS: Evidence for Procedures, Outcomes and Directions for Future Research

  • Shawn P. Quigley
  • Stephanie M. Peterson
  • Jessica E. Frieder
  • Kimberly M. Peck
Original Research

Abstract

SAFMEDS is an assessment and instructional strategy pioneered in the late 1970s by Ogden Lindsley. SAFMEDS was developed as an extension and improvement of flashcards. The aims of this article are to provide an overview of the literature related to SAFMEDS and to identify further research needs. The results of this review suggest that a great deal of research is still needed to clarify the SAFMEDS procedures and the benefits of SAFMEDS over traditional instruction. These conclusions are in line with broader criticisms of fluency-based instruction.

Keywords

SAFMEDS Flashcards Fluency Precision teaching 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Appendix A: Additional SAFMEDS References not Included in the Review

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shawn P. Quigley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephanie M. Peterson
    • 1
  • Jessica E. Frieder
    • 1
  • Kimberly M. Peck
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.Center for Development and DisabilityUniversity of New Mexico Medical GroupAlbuquerqueUSA

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