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Current Review of Pneumoconiosis Among US Coal Miners

  • Noemi B. HallEmail author
  • David J. Blackley
  • Cara N. Halldin
  • A. Scott Laney
Occupational Health (K Applebaum and M Friesen, Section Editors)
  • 15 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Occupational Health

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This review summarizes recent research on pneumoconiosis in coal workers following the identification of the resurgence of this disease among US coal miners in the early 2000s. We describe the impact of this research and how this has led to increased public attention, benefitting affected miners.

Recent Findings

The latest research shows that the prevalence of pneumoconiosis, including progressive massive fibrosis, continues to increase, especially in central Appalachia. Contributing factors may include mining of thin coal seams or cutting rock to access coal, which may expose miners to coal mine dust with a higher content of silica and silicates than in the past.

Summary

The impact of recently implemented changes, such as the reduced occupational exposure limit for respirable coal mine dust and the introduction of continuous personal dust monitors, will likely take years to appropriately evaluate.

Keywords

Pneumoconiosis Coal miners Environmental health 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Disclaimer

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noemi B. Hall
    • 1
    Email author
  • David J. Blackley
    • 1
  • Cara N. Halldin
    • 1
  • A. Scott Laney
    • 1
  1. 1.Surveillance Branch, Respiratory Health Division, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Institute for Occupational Safety and HealthMorgantownUSA

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