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The issue of dementia in migrants and ethnic minorities: the perspective of National Dementia Plans

  • Marco CanevelliEmail author
  • Valerio Zaccaria
  • Eleonora Lacorte
  • Ilaria Cova
  • Giuseppe Gervasi
  • Silvia Cascini
  • Anna Maria Bargagli
  • Teresa Di Fiandra
  • Simone Pomati
  • Leonardo Pantoni
  • Nicola Vanacore
Original Article
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Abstract

Background

The occurrence of dementia among individuals with a migration background and composing ethnic minorities is being recognized as a global public health issue.

Aims

In the present study, we sought to explore if and how this phenomenon is mentioned and addressed by the existing National Dementia Plans (NDPs).

Methods

The 32 NDPs listed on the Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI)’s website were considered for the present analysis. First, the plans mentioning the issue of dementia among migrants and/or ethnic minorities were identified. Subsequently, the sections addressing this topic and the pertaining proposed actions were analyzed and their contents were unbundled in descriptive categories.

Results

Overall, nine NDPs (28.1% of the total), namely those promulgated by Australia, Austria, England, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, Taiwan, United States, and Wales, mentioned the issue of dementia among migrants and/or ethnic minorities and only eight proposed targeted actions to tackle this issue. With few exceptions, the proposed strategies were only marginally dashed within NDPs and crucial information on their objectives, timeline, conduction, and monitoring was missing.

Discussion and conclusions

To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to describe and discuss how the issue of dementia among migrants and ethnic minority groups is addressed within NDPs. The issue of dementia in migrants and ethnic minorities is assuming a growing relevance under a of global health perspective. The timely identification and implementation of dedicated policies at the national and international level are fundamental to limit its future clinical and socioeconomic burden.

Keywords

Dementia Migration Cognitive disturbances Global health Health inequalities Cross-cultural assessment 

Notes

Funding

Authors have no funding source to disclose for the present study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Marco Canevelli is supported by a research grant of the Italian Ministry of Health (GR-2016-02364975) for the project “Dementia in immigrants and ethnic minorities living in Italy: clinical-epidemiological aspects and public health perspectives” (ImmiDem). The other authors have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Informed consent

For this type of study, formal informed consent is not required.

Statement of human and animal rights

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Canevelli
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Valerio Zaccaria
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eleonora Lacorte
    • 2
  • Ilaria Cova
    • 3
  • Giuseppe Gervasi
    • 2
  • Silvia Cascini
    • 4
  • Anna Maria Bargagli
    • 4
  • Teresa Di Fiandra
    • 5
  • Simone Pomati
    • 3
  • Leonardo Pantoni
    • 6
  • Nicola Vanacore
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Neuroscience“Sapienza” UniversityRomeItaly
  2. 2.National Center for Disease Prevention and Health PromotionNational Institute of HealthRomeItaly
  3. 3.Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions“Luigi Sacco” University HospitalMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of EpidemiologyRegional Health ServiceRomeItaly
  5. 5.General Directorate for Health PreventionMinistry of HealthRomeItaly
  6. 6.Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences “Luigi Sacco”University of MilanMilanItaly

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