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Relationship between blood pressure variability and cognitive function in geriatric hypertensive patients with well-controlled blood pressure

  • Erkan Yıldırım
  • Emrah Ermis
  • Samir Allahverdiyev
  • Hakan Ucar
  • Serap Yavuzer
  • Hakan Yavuzer
  • Mahir CengizEmail author
Original Article
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and cognitive function. Blood pressure (BP) variability has been associated with cognitive dysfunction, but data are sparse regarding the relationship between BP variability and cognitive function in geriatric patients with well-controlled BP.

Aim

The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between blood pressure variability and cognitive functions in geriatric hypertensive patients with well-controlled BP.

Method

We analyzed 435 hypertensive patients (167 male, 74.9 ± 8.3; 268 female, 76.1 ± 8.6) treated at least with one antihypertensive drug. All patients underwent ambulatory BP monitoring and the standardized mini mental test (sMMT).

Results

We divided the weighted standard deviation (SD) of systolic BP (SBP) as a measure of BP variability into quartiles. The top quartile group (≥ 18.5 mmHg) had a significantly lower total sMMT score (23.3 ± 3.2, p < 0.001). According to the results of multivariate logistic regression analysis for sMMT, the SD of 24-h SBP was related to sMMT (p = 0.007, 95% confidence interval − 0.301 [− 0.370 to − 0.049]).

Discussion

Although there are some inconsistencies among the studies investigating the relationship between blood pressure variability and cognitive functions in elderly patients, we demonstrated the relationship between increased 24-h blood pressure variability and cognitive functions assessed with sMMT in geriatric population with well-controlled BP.

Conclusion

The increased blood pressure variability was associated with poorer cognitive functions in geriatric hypertensive patients with well-controlled blood pressure.

Keywords

Cognitive function Hypertension Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring Blood pressure variability Standardized mini-mental test 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Statement of human and animal rights

The protocol for sample collection was approved by the Biruni University, Medical Faculty Ethics Committee and was carried out according to the requirements of the Second Declaration of Helsinki. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

All patients were fully informed of the study procedures before providing written consent.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CardiologyBiruni University Faculty of MedicineIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineBiruni University Faculty of MedicineIstanbulTurkey
  3. 3.Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of MedicineIstanbul University CerrahpasaIstanbulTurkey

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