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Reading Instruction for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review and Quality Analysis

  • Benjamin BaileyEmail author
  • Joanne Arciuli
Review Paper

Abstract

This study reviews the literature on reading instruction consistent with the recommendations of the National Reading Panel (NRP; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2000) for children with autism spectrum disorder, using the Evaluative Method for Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Autism to assess research quality (Reichow, Volkmar, & Cicchetti, 2008). A search of the literature published between 2009 and 2017 identified 10,779 relevant records, of which 19 met inclusion criteria. Studies reported gains in phonics, reading accuracy, reading fluency, and/or reading comprehension skills; however, few were of adequate or strong quality. Instruction that incorporated multiple Big Five elements from the NRP was associated with gains in reading accuracy and comprehension as well as relatively high quality ratings. Clinical implications and priorities for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Autism Reading Literacy National Reading Panel Systematic review Quality analysis 

Notes

Funding Information

This work was partly supported by a mid-career research fellowship awarded to Joanne Arciuli by the Australian Research Council (FT130101570).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

References marked with an asterisk were included in the review.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Disability Research and PolicyUniversity of SydneyLidcombeAustralia
  2. 2.Graduate School of HealthUniversity of Technology SydneyUltimoAustralia

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