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Effective Interventions in Teaching Employment Skills to Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Single-Case Meta-analysis

  • Margot Boles
  • Jennifer Ganz
  • Shanna Hagan-Burke
  • Ee Rea Hong
  • Leslie C. NeelyEmail author
  • John L. Davis
  • Dalun Zhang
Review Paper
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

This meta-analysis analyzed 39 studies that met the inclusion criteria for employment-related interventions for individuals with developmental disabilities. Each experiment included in this analysis either met or met with reservations all of the basic design standards (Kratochwill et al. 2010, 2013). Tau-U effect sizes were calculated for each A–B contrast extracted from the included experiments, and moderator analyses were conducted for dependent variables, participant characteristics, setting characteristics, and implementer characteristics for all video modeling interventions. Moderate to strong effects were seen across almost all moderator levels, and few significant differences were determined between the levels. According to overall effect sizes, all interventions were effective, but video modeling interventions were considered not only to be effective but also evidence-based interventions in teaching employment skills to individuals with developmental disabilities.

Keywords

Meta-analysis Employment ASD ID Developmental disabilities 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

*Indicates studies included in the review

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Texas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  3. 3.University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan
  4. 4.University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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