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Current Epidemiology Reports

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 300–309 | Cite as

Risk Factors Associated with Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli: a Systematic Review

  • Cheyenne R. ButcherEmail author
  • Julia Rubin
  • Kaitlyn Mussio
  • Lee W. Riley
Infectious Disease Epidemiology (A Reingold, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Infectious Disease Epidemiology

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This review aims to characterize the current body of knowledge regarding risk factors for community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Our purpose is to identify major knowledge gaps, suggest potential areas for improved public health intervention, and propose future research directions.

Recent Findings

This review contains two parts. Part one reviews 15 studies that included 2,930 ESBL-producing UPEC infections in 10 countries. Of the 103 risk factors for these infections examined, only two of eight commonly-assessed factors demonstrated concordant significant results across studies. Part two focuses on 19 studies that examined 2,042 ESBL-producing extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains isolated from environmental, food, or animal sources and discovered evidence for occurrence of all six pandemic ExPEC lineages associated with CA-UTI in these sources.

Summary

This review has demonstrated inconsistent evidence regarding patient level risk factors associated with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing UPEC. However, reviewed studies reveal exposures to food, animal, or environmental sources to be potential risk factors for infection with common ESBL-producing E. coli.

Keywords

Antimicrobial resistance Extended-spectrum β-lactamase Risk factors Urinary tract infection Community-acquired urinary tract infection Multilocus sequence typing 

Notes

Compliance With Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by the author.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheyenne R. Butcher
    • 1
    Email author
  • Julia Rubin
    • 1
  • Kaitlyn Mussio
    • 2
  • Lee W. Riley
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Public Health, Division of EpidemiologyUniversity of California BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health SciencesUniversity of California BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.School of Public Health, Division of Infectious Disease and VaccinologyUniversity of California BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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