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European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 83–89 | Cite as

Effect of dark discolouration and enamel/dentine fracture on the oral health-related quality of life of pre-schoolers

  • J. Ramos-JorgeEmail author
  • A. C. Sá-Pinto
  • I. Almeida Pordeus
  • S. Martins Paiva
  • C. Castro Martins
  • M. L. Ramos-Jorge
Original Scientific Article

Abstract

Aim

To determine the effect of different types of dental trauma on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among pre-school children.

Methods

Four hundred fifty-nine Brazilian pre-schoolers aged 3–5 years were submitted to an oral examination in the school environment for the evaluation of dental trauma using the criteria proposed by Andreasen et al. (2007). Parents answered a questionnaire on the OHRQoL of the children using the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) and another one on socio-demographic characteristics of the children and their families. The questionnaires were sent to the parents to be answered at home. Descriptive statistics, Mann–Whitney test and Poisson regression were used for statistical analysis.

Results

Children with dark discolouration and enamel–dentine fracture without pulp exposure had higher mean ECOHIS scores than those without these alterations. The multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that pre-school children with dark discolouration (PR 1.79; 95% CI 1.24–2.58) and enamel–dentine fracture without pulp exposure (PR 1.89; 95% CI 1.22–2.92) had a higher impact on quality of life than those without these alterations.

Conclusion

Dark discolouration and enamel–dentine fracture without pulp exposure were associated with a negative impact on the life of pre-schoolers.

Keywords

Tooth injuries Incisor Pre-school children Quality of life 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), State of Minas Gerais Research Foundation (FAPEMIG) and Coordination for Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) supported this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ramos-Jorge
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. C. Sá-Pinto
    • 2
  • I. Almeida Pordeus
    • 1
  • S. Martins Paiva
    • 1
  • C. Castro Martins
    • 1
  • M. L. Ramos-Jorge
    • 2
  1. 1.Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e MucuriDiamantinaBrazil

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