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Reply to Tarp et al.: Comment on: “Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Childhood and Adolescence Affects Future Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies”

  • Stijn Mintjens
  • Malou D. Menting
  • Joost G. Daams
  • Mireille N. M. van Poppel
  • Tessa J. Roseboom
  • Reinoud J. B. J. Gemke
Letter to the Editor
  • 31 Downloads

Dear Editor,

We appreciate the insightful comments and observations by Tarp et al. [1] regarding our systematic review [2]. The suggestions and nuances raised are important aspects when interpreting the findings of this systematic review and may aid future reviews on the topic. We are grateful for the opportunity to clarify some of the topics they raise [1].

Tarp et al. [1] justifiably argue that field-based and sub-maximal tests cannot provide precise estimates of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). As the purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether a relatively higher level of CRF was associated with poorer future cardiometabolic health, we felt the inclusion of field tests appropriate, since these tests are the most (often only) feasible option in cohort studies. Field testing has also been shown to have moderate to good validity compared with criterion tests [3]. Thus, although we would support using the most reliable assessment of the exposure, i.e., a laboratory-based...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this letter.

Conflict of interest

Stijn Mintjens, Malou Menting, Joost Daams, Mireille van Poppel, Tessa Roseboom and Reinoud Gemke have no conflicts of interest relevant to the content of this letter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stijn Mintjens
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Malou D. Menting
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joost G. Daams
    • 4
  • Mireille N. M. van Poppel
    • 5
    • 6
  • Tessa J. Roseboom
    • 2
    • 3
  • Reinoud J. B. J. Gemke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam Reproduction and Development, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMCUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Amsterdam Reproduction and Development, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMCUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam Reproduction and Development, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMCUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Medical Library AMC, Amsterdam UMCUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMCUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Institute of Sport ScienceUniversity of GrazGrazAustria

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