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PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News

, Volume 821, Issue 1, pp 18–18 | Cite as

Influence of price disclosure in direct-to-consumer advertising

Clinical study

Drug price disclosure in direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising (DTCA) in the US appears to have little influence on consumer response to low-priced drugs but may reduce interest in high-priced drugs, according to findings of a study published as a research letter in JAMA Internal Medicine.1

A total of 850 adults 18−75 years of age recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk were told to assume they had a recent diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and randomised to view one of five advertisements for a hypothetical prescription drug, Mayzerium. No drug price was mentioned in the control advertisement, but drug prices ranged from a low price of $50 to a high price of $15 000 per month in the other advertisements (based on 2016 wholesale prices for antihyperglycaemic prescription drugs). Participants then completed a questionnaire on the likelihood of discussing, investigating and taking the drug, and questioned about the expected out-of-pocket (OOP) cost and perceived...

References

  1. 1.
    Garrett JB, et al. Consumer Responses to Price Disclosure in Direct-to-Consumer Pharmaceutical Advertising. JAMA Internal Medicine : 22 Jan 2019. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5976Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dickson S. Estimates of the Number of Brand-Name Drugs Affected by the Medicaid Rebate Cap in 2017. JAMA Internal Medicine : 22 Jan 2019. Available from: URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6559Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sarpatwari A, et al. Tepid Steps on Drug Pricing. JAMA Internal Medicine : 22 Jan 2019. Available from: URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6593Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

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