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Drugs

, Volume 79, Issue 18, pp 1977–1987 | Cite as

Sotagliflozin: A Review in Type 1 Diabetes

  • Emma D. DeeksEmail author
Adis Drug Evaluation
  • 50 Downloads

Abstract

Sotagliflozin (Zynquista™) is the first dual inhibitor of sodium-glucose co-transporter-1 and -2 (SGLT1 and 2). In the phase 3, inTANDEM 1–3 trials, adjunctive use of oral sotagliflozin (200 mg or 400 mg once daily) improved glycaemic control and reduced bodyweight and insulin requirements relative to placebo over 24 weeks of treatment in adults whose type 1 diabetes (T1D) was inadequately controlled by insulin therapy. Similar benefits were seen with the drug in patients who were overweight/obese [i.e. body mass index (BMI) ≥ 27 kg/m2] in inTANDEM 1 and 2 (pooled). The benefits of sotagliflozin were largely maintained over 52 weeks of treatment. Overall, use of sotagliflozin in this setting is generally well tolerated and reduces, or at least does not increase, the likelihood of hypoglycaemia; however, as with other SGLT inhibitors, sotagliflozin carries a risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). On the basis of its risk/benefit profile, sotagliflozin is indicated in the EU as an adjunct to insulin in adults with T1D with a BMI ≥ 27 kg/m2 who have failed to achieve adequate glycaemic control despite optimal insulin therapy, thus expanding the currently limited adjunctive oral treatment options available for use in this population.

Notes

Acknowledegments

During the peer review process, the marketing authorization holder of sotagliflozin was also offered the opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflicts of interest

Emma Deeks is a salaried employee of Adis International Ltd/Springer Nature, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Springer NatureAucklandNew Zealand

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