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CNS Drugs

, Volume 33, Issue 7, pp 707–718 | Cite as

Rotigotine Transdermal Patch: A Review in Parkinson’s Disease

  • James E. FramptonEmail author
Adis Drug Evaluation
  • 91 Downloads

Abstract

Rotigotine (Neupro®), a non-ergolinic dopamine agonist (DA), is administered once daily via a transdermal patch (TP) that delivers the drug over a 24-h period. In the EU, the rotigotine TP is approved as monotherapy for the treatment of early Parkinson’s disease (PD) and as combination therapy with levodopa throughout the course of the disease. It is also approved for the treatment of PD in numerous other countries, including Australia, the USA, China and Japan. Rotigotine TP effectively improved motor and overall functioning in clinical trials in Caucasian and Asian patients with early PD (as monotherapy) or advanced PD (in combination with levodopa); treatment benefits appeared to be maintained in open-label extensions that followed patients for up to 6 years. Rotigotine TP was not consistently non-inferior to ropinirole and pramipexole in studies that included these oral non-ergolinic DAs as active comparators. Rotigotine TP variously improved some non-motor symptoms of PD, in particular sleep disturbances and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), based on findings from individual studies and/or a meta-analysis. Rotigotine TP was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile characterized by adverse events typical of dopaminergic stimulation and transdermal patch application. Available for more than a decade, rotigotine TP is a well-established, once-daily DA formulation for use in the short- and longer-term treatment of PD. It offers a convenient alternative when non-oral administration of medication is preferred and may be particularly useful in patients with gastrointestinal disturbances that reduce the suitability of oral medication.

Notes

Acknowledgements

During the peer review process, the manufacturer of rotigotine TP was also offered an opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflicts of interest

James Frampton is a salaried employee of Adis International Ltd/Springer Nature, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Springer NatureAucklandNew Zealand

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