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Appropriateness of insulin commencement and adequacy of glycemic control among ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes in Ethiopia

  • Adane Teshome KefaleEmail author
  • Tessema Tsehay Biru
  • Habtamu Acho Addo
Research article
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Knowing when to start insulin is central to optimal management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but a real clinical challenge. Poor glycemic control is critical for development of the deadly diabetic complications.

Objective

The aim of the study was to assess the appropriateness of insulin commencement, adequacy of glycemic control and associated factors among patients with T2DM.

Settings

The study was conducted at three public hospitals in Southwest Ethiopia.

Methods

Cross sectional study was conducted using structured questionnaire and data abstraction format. All patients with T2DM who were available during the data collection period and fulfilling study criteria were included.

Main outcome measure

Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was done for identifying factors associated with poor glycemic control by taking statistical significance at p value ≤0.05.

Results

One hundred sixty nine patient data was considered for analysis. Insulin was initiated in 28 patients, but only 10(35.7%) insulin commencements were appropriate. More than two third (70.4%) of the studied population had poor glycemic control. Addition of second antidiabetic medication (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3–6.2) and living in urban areas (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1–5.7) were associated with poor glycemic control while having regular diabetic care follow up of every >1 month (AOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2–0.9) was negatively associated with poor glycemic control.

Conclusions

About two third of insulin commencements were inappropriate and majority of patients could not stay on optimal glycemic control. Addition of second antidiabetic medication and living in urban areas were found to be associated with poor glycemic control.

Impact of findings on practice statements

• Initiation of insulin before optimization of oral agents increase cost of care.

• Proper titration of the first oral agent is important prior to adding other antidiabetic agents.

• Emphasis should be given to improve glycemic control, and hence halt subsequent complications.

Keywords

T2DM Glycemic control Insulin Southwest Ethiopia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to extend our gratitude to Mizan Tepi University, Research Directorate for funding this study.

Authors’ contributions

TT: Selecting title, conceiving methodology, facilitating data collection, involved in data analysis, preparing manuscript.

AT: Selecting title, conceiving methodology, facilitating data collection, involved in data analysis, editing manuscript.

HA: Selecting title, conceiving methodology, facilitating data collection, involved in data analysis, editing manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declared that they have no conflict of interest.

Consent for publication

Not applicable.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mizan Tepi UniversityMizan-AmanEthiopia
  2. 2.Wollo UniversityDessieEthiopia

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