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Phyco-Nanotechnology: New Horizons of Gold Nano-Factories

  • Pallavi Saxena
  • HarishEmail author
Review

Abstract

Nanoparticles are gaining importance as versatile materials showing novel or advanced characteristics as compared to larger particles. Synthesis of nanoparticles is being done via chemical and physical methods, and it restricts the potential applications in fields like biomedical and agriculture. Among the biological resources, algae have a tremendous role in bioconversion to different particles. Several applications of metal nanoparticles and nanomaterials have emerged in recent past. Among these, gold nanoparticles have their significant role owing to their potential use in nanoelectronics, deoxyribonucleic acid labeling and biosensor development. This review paper focuses on the use of algae for gold nanoparticle synthesis and on its potential and future prospects as well. It can be concluded that various factors like different algae, pH, protocol, time and pigments affect the shape, structure, size and yield of gold nanoparticles synthesized by the algae. Further, potential applications of nanoparticles synthesized by different algae have been reported.

Keywords

Algae Gold Nanoparticles Green synthesis Nanobiotechnology 

Abbreviations

AFM

Atomic force microscope

APX

Ascorbate peroxidase

Au

Gold

CAT

Catalase

DLS

Dynamic light scattering

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid

EPS

Exopolysaccharides

FESEM

Field emission scanning electron microscope

FTIR

Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

MTT

3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide

PVP

Polyvinylpyrrolidone

SAED

Selected area electron diffraction pattern

SEM

Scanning electron microscope

SOD

Superoxide dismutase

TEM

Transmission electron microscope

WD-XRF

Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence

XRD

X-ray powder diffraction

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the support of the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi for the Grant Project (No. F.20-11(21)/2012(BSR)) for conducting this work. They acknowledge support of UGC, New Delhi for the award of BSR meritorious fellowship [F.25-a/2013-14(BSR)/7-125/2007(BSR)]. The authors are thankful to Dr. Vinod Singh Gour (Amity University, Jaipur) for improving the manuscript. They also acknowledge the help of English language experts Dr. Manoj Kumar (Amity University, Jaipur) and Dr. Mahendra S. Purohit (Govt. Sr. Sec. School, Udaipur, Rajasthan) for thorough revision of the manuscript for grammar and sentence structure.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

None declared.

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Copyright information

© The National Academy of Sciences, India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BotanyMohanlal Sukhadia UniversityUdaipurIndia

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