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Effect of surfactant on the preparation and characterization of gemcitabine-loaded particles

  • Ji-Ho Lim
  • Young-Guk Na
  • Hong-Ki Lee
  • Sung-Jin Kim
  • Hye-Jin Lee
  • Ki-Hyun Bang
  • Miao Wang
  • Yong-Chul Pyo
  • Hyun-Wook Huh
  • Cheong-Weon Cho
Original Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Gemcitabine is used in the treatment of several solid tumors as one of anticancer nucleoside analogues and is necessary to administer high doses to achieve the desired therapeutic response. However, this treatment may be related to severe side effects. For improvement of the encapsulation efficiency of gemcitabine for gemcitabine-loaded nanoparticle composed of biodegradable polymer and reducing the side effects due to the high concentration of gemcitabine, we formulated gemcitabine-loaded PLGA particles using chitosan and different type of surfactant. The gemcitabine-loaded particles were prepared using a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The effects of surfactants to modify the size of gemcitabine-loaded particles were different. The mean diameters of gemcitabine-loaded particles ranged from 400.8 nm to 1712.7 nm. The surface charge of gemcitabine particles was − 5.62 mV to 1.46 mV. The encapsulation efficiency of gemcitabine-loaded particles was found to be 29.56–34.38%. Interestingly, the addition of surfactant could be improved an encapsulation efficiency of gemcitabine.

Keywords

Gemcitabine Polymeric nanoparticles Surfactan Encapsulation efficiency Cytotoxicity 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This article does not contain any studies with human and animal subjects performed by any of the authors. All authors (J.H. Lim, Y.G. Na, H.K. Lee, K.H. Bang, S.J. Kim, H.J. Lee, M. Wang, Y.C. Pyo, H.W. Huh, C.W. Cho) declare that they have no conflict of interest. This work was supported by the research fund of Chungnam National University.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ji-Ho Lim
    • 1
  • Young-Guk Na
    • 1
  • Hong-Ki Lee
    • 1
  • Sung-Jin Kim
    • 1
  • Hye-Jin Lee
    • 1
  • Ki-Hyun Bang
    • 1
  • Miao Wang
    • 1
  • Yong-Chul Pyo
    • 1
  • Hyun-Wook Huh
    • 1
  • Cheong-Weon Cho
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Pharmacy, Institute of Drug Research and DevelopmentChungnam National UniversityDaejeonSouth Korea

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