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Infection

pp 1–4 | Cite as

Successful adjunctive use of bacteriophage therapy for treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a cystic fibrosis patient

  • Nancy LawEmail author
  • Cathy Logan
  • Gordon Yung
  • Carrie-Lynn Langlais Furr
  • Susan M. Lehman
  • Sandra Morales
  • Francisco Rosas
  • Alexander Gaidamaka
  • Igor Bilinsky
  • Paul Grint
  • Robert T. Schooley
  • Saima Aslam
Case Report

Abstract

Introduction

We describe the use of bacteriophage therapy in a 26-year-old cystic fibrosis (CF) patient awaiting lung transplantation.

Hospital Course

The patient developed multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, persistent respiratory failure, and colistin-induced renal failure. We describe the use of intravenous bacteriophage therapy (BT) along with systemic antibiotics in this patient, lack of adverse events, and clinical resolution of infection with this approach. She did not have recurrence of pseudomonal pneumonia and CF exacerbation within 100 days following the end of BT and underwent successful bilateral lung transplantation 9 months later.

Conclusion

Given the concern for MDR P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients, BT may offer a viable anti-infective adjunct to traditional antibiotic therapy.

Keywords

Bacteriophage therapy Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic fibrosis Lung transplant Antimicrobial Antibiotic 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

15010_2019_1319_MOESM1_ESM.docx (106 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 105 kb)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Law
    • 1
    Email author
  • Cathy Logan
    • 1
  • Gordon Yung
    • 2
  • Carrie-Lynn Langlais Furr
    • 3
  • Susan M. Lehman
    • 3
  • Sandra Morales
    • 3
  • Francisco Rosas
    • 3
  • Alexander Gaidamaka
    • 3
  • Igor Bilinsky
    • 3
  • Paul Grint
    • 3
  • Robert T. Schooley
    • 1
    • 4
  • Saima Aslam
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases and Global HealthUniversity of California, San DiegoLa Jolla, San DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep MedicineUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  3. 3.Ampliphi Biosciences CorporationSan DiegoUSA
  4. 4.Center for Innovative Phage Applications and TherapeuticsUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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