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The synthesis of magnetic X zeolites and their uptake of fluoride ion and lead ion

  • X. W. Liu
  • J. L. CaoEmail author
Original Paper
  • 40 Downloads

Abstract

In order to solve the problem of the separation of zeolites powder from disposal solution, the magnetic zeolites are synthesized by hydrothermal method. A series of zeolite samples with different iron content are reduced and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis and magnetism testing. The results show that the crystalline structures of iron-incorporated zeolites are well integrated. When iron content in zeolites is low, the structure of iron-incorporated X zeolites is not changed, but it transforms to the same structure as 4A zeolites when the iron content is high. The iron-incorporated zeolites still maintain crystalline structure on hydrogen reduction below 700 °C, and their structures are destroyed completely when the reduction temperature rises up to 800 °C. The adsorptive experiments of fluoride ion and lead ion are carried out. The results show that the adsorption capacity of fluoride ions decreases slightly, but that of Pb2+ reaches the maximum when iron content is 2.98%. The magnetization process has little effect on the adsorption of F and Pb2+.

Keywords

X zeolites Magnetism Hydrothermal method Adsorption 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank all who assisted in conducting this work.

Funding

The financial supports of the National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant No. 204760211] and Education Foundation of Hebei Province [Grant No. 2006332] are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Islamic Azad University (IAU) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Chemical EngineeringHebei University of TechnologyTianjinChina

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