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Journal of the Iranian Chemical Society

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 315–324 | Cite as

The impact of slaughtering methods on physicochemical characterization of sheep myoglobin

  • Elnaz Hosseini
  • Roghayeh Sattari
  • Shohreh Ariaeenejad
  • Maryam Salami
  • Zahra Emam-Djomeh
  • Leila Fotouhi
  • Najmeh Poursasan
  • Nader Sheibani
  • Seyed Mahdi Ghamsari
  • Ali Akbar Moosavi-MovahediEmail author
Original Paper
  • 35 Downloads

Abstract

Recent data showed that the consumption of halal meat is increasing around the world. However, little is known about the physiochemical and digestive properties of meat prepared by this method. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of enzymatic hydrolysis with digestive enzymes on sheep meat myoglobin (Mb) prepared by two different slaughtering methods: halal slaughter (HS) and industrial slaughter (IS). The texture profile analysis (TPA) of samples and their antioxidant activity, using a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity scale, were determined. Mb was selected for the confirmation of digestion tests. In addition, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heme degradation of Mb samples were determined using chemiluminescence and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The results showed that IS-Mb had more hydrophobicity, produced more ROS, and had a greater tendency for aggregation compared with HS-Mb. Both higher aggregation and ROS production resulted in less digestion of IS-Mb. TPA tests showed an increase in tenderness of HS samples compared with IS samples. The extent of HS samples hydrolysis was significantly greater than IS samples when treated in parallel with pancreatic enzymes. Peptides generally have significantly higher antioxidant activity than their intact parental proteins. Thus, the high antioxidant activity of HS samples is consistent with their enhanced hydrolysis.

Graphical abstract

Higher aggregation and ROS production both play a crucial role in less digestion of Non-HSMb.

Keywords

Halal and industrial slaughtering Myoglobin Sheep 

Abbreviations

Mb

Myoglobin

HS

Halal slaughtering

IS

Industrial slaughtering

ROS

Radical oxygen species

TPA

Texture profile analysis

Notes

Acknowledgements

The support of University of Tehran, Iran National Science Foundation (INSF), Center for International Scientific Studies and Collaborations (CISSC)-Ministry of Science, Research and Technology and UNESCO Chair on Interdisciplinary Research in Diabetes is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Iranian Chemical Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elnaz Hosseini
    • 1
  • Roghayeh Sattari
    • 1
  • Shohreh Ariaeenejad
    • 2
  • Maryam Salami
    • 3
  • Zahra Emam-Djomeh
    • 3
  • Leila Fotouhi
    • 1
  • Najmeh Poursasan
    • 1
  • Nader Sheibani
    • 4
  • Seyed Mahdi Ghamsari
    • 5
  • Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi
    • 1
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics (IBB)University of TehranTehranIran
  2. 2.Systems Biology Department, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII)Agricultural Research Education and Extension Organization (AREO)KarajIran
  3. 3.Department of Food Science, Engineering and Technology, College of Agriculture and Natural ResourcesUniversity of TehranKarajIran
  4. 4.Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Biomedical Engineering, Cell and Regenerative BiologyUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of TehranTehranIran
  6. 6.UNESCO Chair on Interdisciplinary Research in DiabetesUniversity of TehranTehranIran

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