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International Cancer Conference Journal

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 89–93 | Cite as

Adenocarcinoma of intestinal type of the vulva

  • Tomoko KuritaEmail author
  • Yusuke Matuura
  • Masanori Hisaoka
  • Toru Hachisuga
Case report
  • 32 Downloads

Abstract

Primary adenocarcinoma of the vulva is a rare disease, and usually arises in a Bartholin gland or occurs in association with Paget’s disease. Furthermore, adenocarcinoma of intestinal type of the vulva is an extremely rare neoplasm, and few cases have been reported. The appropriate treatment for optimal prognosis is unclear. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of intestinal type of the vulva occurring in a 63-year-old female. The tumor was found near the urethra, and biopsy specimen showed a proliferation of signet ring cells embedded in an abundant myxoid stroma and irregular tubular structures of atypical columnar epithelium. An extensive workup showed no metastases. Local excision with a 2-cm lesion in the vulva side, bilateral superficial inguinal lymph node dissection and Cloquet lymph node biopsy were performed. Cancer cells contained mucinous materials in the cytoplasm, which exhibited diffuse positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and CDX2. The final pathologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of intestinal type of the vulva (pT1bN0M0). The patient received adjuvant external irradiation because of positive urethral surgical margin. She is well 1 year after therapy. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin 20 and polyclonal CDX2 is helpful with investigation of adenocarcinoma of intestinal type, but long-term prognosis remains unclear.

Keywords

Adenocarcinoma Intestinal type Immunohistochemistry Vulva 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank James P. Mahaffey, PhD, from Edanz Group (http://www.edanzediting.com/ac) for editing a draft of this manuscript.

Funding

There is no editorial or financial conflict of interest among authors.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors have no conflict of interest to disclose.

Consent for publication

The case report approval was obtained from the Hospital Research Ethics Board.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© The Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomoko Kurita
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yusuke Matuura
    • 2
  • Masanori Hisaoka
    • 3
  • Toru Hachisuga
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of MedicineUniversity of Occupational and Environmental HealthKitakyushuJapan
  2. 2.Department of Nursing of human broad development, School of MedicineUniversity of Occupational and Environmental HealthKitakyushuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Pathology, School of MedicineUniversity of Occupational and Environmental HealthKitakyushuJapan
  4. 4.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySteel Memorial Yahata HospitalKitakyushuJapan

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