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Current Geriatrics Reports

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 168–174 | Cite as

Impact of Geriatric Syndromes on Diabetes Management

  • Christine Slyne
  • Medha N. MunshiEmail author
Nutrition, Obesity, and Diabetes (H Florez, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Nutrition, Obesity, and Diabetes

Abstract

Purpose of Review

In this review, we describe the components and importance of geriatric syndrome, a term describing age-related disorders coexisting in older adults with diabetes. With the aging of the population, and a higher prevalence of diabetes in older adults, we are seeing a higher prevalence of age-related conditions in older diabetes patients, resulting in high human and economic costs. Successful education and management of diabetes in older adults warrants a better understanding of these unique challenges faced by individual older adults.

Recent Findings

Expert opinions have established the importance of recognizing geriatric syndrome and its management in older adults with diabetes. However, recent studies have shown that this approach is not yet common in patient care. Patients with significant burden of comorbidities are being treated similarly to those without this burden. Newer studies have identified individualized glycemic goals and strategies to de-intensify treatment regimens in older adults.

Summary

It is important that before forming management plans, the physical, social, and emotional/cognitive status of an older individual with diabetes are considered. In doing so, individualized goals for management of diabetes as well as other coexisting diseases can be established, leading to optimized treatment efficacy, adherence, and improved health outcomes that are relevant to the older population. The objective of this review is to raise clinician awareness of the presence of geriatric syndrome in this increasingly large patient population.

Keywords

Older adults Geriatric syndrome Co-morbidities Diabetes management 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Medha Munshi reports grants from Sanofi and payment as a consultant for Sanofi and Novonordisk.

Christine Slyne declares no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

All reported studies/experiments with human or animal subjects performed by the authors have been previously published and complied with all applicable ethical standards (including the Helsinki Declaration and its amendments, institutional/national research committee standards, and international/national/institutional guidelines).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Joslin Diabetes CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterBostonUSA
  3. 3.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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