Demography

, Volume 55, Issue 2, pp 693–719 | Cite as

Is Demography Just a Numerical Exercise? Numbers, Politics, and Legacies of China’s One-Child Policy

  • Feng Wang
  • Yong Cai
  • Ke Shen
  • Stuart Gietel-Basten
Article
  • 487 Downloads

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Martin Whyte, Baochang Gu, and William Lavely for valuable comments and suggestions. The research is supported in part by Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which receives funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P2C HD050924), School of Social Development and Public Policy at Fudan University, and the China National Science Foundation (71490734, 71461137003). Wang Feng’s work for this research was supported in part by the Cariparo Foundation and the University of Padova, where he was a visiting research professor.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Feng Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong Cai
    • 3
  • Ke Shen
    • 2
  • Stuart Gietel-Basten
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  2. 2.School of Social Development and Public PolicyFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Division of Social ScienceThe Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyClear Water BayHong Kong

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