Journal of Applied Genetics

, Volume 59, Issue 2, pp 149–150 | Cite as

Correction to: Craniosynostosis as a clinical and diagnostic problem: molecular pathology and genetic counseling

  • Anna Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak
  • Monika Gos
  • Ewa Obersztyn
Correction
  • 153 Downloads

Correction to: Journal of Applied Genetics 2018

  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13353-017-0423-4

In the original article, figures 1 and 2 were inadvertently interchanged initially. The correct figures are as shown below. The original article has been corrected.
Fig. 1

Schematic localization of cranial sutures (a) and skull deformities associated with a single suture synostosis (b–f). The red lines show suture with premature synostosis and the arrows show the direction of an aberrant compensatory bone growth. The trigonocephaly (b), brachycephaly (c), anterior plagiocephaly (d), scaphocephaly (e), and posterior plagiocephaly (f) observed as a result of a premature closure of metopic, bilateral coronal, unilateral coronal, sagittal, and unilateral lambdoid suture, respectively

Fig. 2

Phenotypic spectrum observed in patients with different craniosynostoses. a–c Patients with Muenke syndrome and p.Pro250Arg mutation in the FGFR3 gene. Female proband (a) with her mother (b) and a girl with de novo mutation (c). d Male patient with Crouzon syndrome and p.Cys278Phe mutation in the FGFR3 gene. e Female proband with Saethre–Chotzen syndrome and c.417_438ins21 (p.Pro139Profs209Ter) mutation in the TWIST1 gene. f, g A clinical presentation of Saethre–Chotzen syndrome in a proband (f) and hismother (g) with a 7p21 microdeletion encompassing the TWIST1 gene

Copyright information

© Institute of Plant Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak
    • 1
  • Monika Gos
    • 1
  • Ewa Obersztyn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical GeneticsInstitute of Mother and ChildWarsawPoland

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