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Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 33–36 | Cite as

Incidence of Side-effects After Weekly Iron and Folic Acid Consumption Among School-going Indian Adolescents

  • Vani SethiEmail author
  • Shikha Yadav
  • Sutapa Agrawal
  • Neha Sareen
  • Nishtha Kathuria
  • Preetu Mishra
  • Jaipal Kapoor
  • Sushma Dureja
Resecrch Paper
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Abstract

Objective

To estimate incidence of side effects after weekly iron and folic acid supplementation (WIFS) in Delhi and Haryana.

Methods

In this cross-sectional school-based study, data were collected from 4,183 adolescents on WIFS consumption and side effects experienced first time of receipt of WIFS (week 1), and in last two consecutive weeks (week 2,3). Week 3 was 48 hours preceding the survey.

Results

WIFS consumption in week 1, 2 and 3 was 85%, 63% and 52%, respectively. Side effects reported were highest in first week (25%) and reduced to 7% (week 2) and 5% (week 3). Side effects most reported were abdominal pain (80%) and nausea (10%). Adolescents (45%) who faced a side-effect in week 1 did not consume WIFS in subsequent week.

Conclusions

Incidence of side effects was low, but it affected compliance. Positive reinforcement to students who face side effects requires strengthening by teachers.

Keywords

Adverse effects Anemia Iron supplementation Prevention 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vani Sethi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Shikha Yadav
    • 2
  • Sutapa Agrawal
    • 2
  • Neha Sareen
    • 2
  • Nishtha Kathuria
    • 2
  • Preetu Mishra
    • 1
  • Jaipal Kapoor
    • 3
  • Sushma Dureja
    • 3
  1. 1.Nutrition SectionUNICEF India Country OfficeNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.New DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Ministry of Health and Family WelfareGovernment of IndiaNew DelhiIndia

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