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International Journal of Steel Structures

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 241–254 | Cite as

Dynamic Crushing Behaviors of Aluminum Foam Filled Energy Absorption Connectors

  • Yonghui WangEmail author
  • Ximei Zhai
Article
  • 97 Downloads

Abstract

This paper presented the numerical studies on the dynamic crushing behaviors of the aluminum foam filled energy absorption connectors. The finite element (FE) model was firstly constructed and the accuracy of the FE model was verified by comparing the force–displacement curves from FE analyses with those from tests and analytical predictions. The numerical results revealed that the deformation mode of the connector under dynamic crushing evidently differed from that under quasi-static loading mainly due to the inertia effect. Besides, the energy absorption capacity was also improved when the dynamic crushing load was applied. Then, the parametric studies on the effects of crushing velocity–time history, angle between flat plate and pleated plate as well as pleated plate thickness on the energy absorption enhancements of the connectors were conducted. Based on the numerical results, two empirical equations were derived in terms of various parameters to predict the energy absorption enhancements of aluminum foam and pleated plate, which could be employed to obtain the force–displacement functions of the connectors under dynamic crushing.

Keywords

Aluminum foam Deformation mode Dynamic crushing Energy absorption connector Numerical study 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research presented in this paper is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.: 51608151), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No.: 2016M600252 and 2017T100245) and Heilongjiang Postdoctoral Fund (Grant No.: LBH–Z16063).

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Copyright information

© Korean Society of Steel Construction 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Lab of Structures Dynamic Behavior and Control of the Ministry of EducationHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinChina
  2. 2.Key Lab of Smart Prevention and Mitigation of Civil Engineering Disasters of the Ministry of Industry and Information TechnologyHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinChina

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