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3 Biotech

, 9:267 | Cite as

Cloning and characterization of special HMW glutenin subunit genes from Aegilops longissima L. and their potential for wheat quality improvement

  • Jinxin Hu
  • Jian Wang
  • Xiong Deng
  • Yueming YanEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Identification and cloning of new glutenin genes from wheat-related species can provide candidate gene resources for quality improvement of wheat. In this study, ten special high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), including five x-type (1Sl2x, 1Sl16x, 1Sl17x, 1Sl23x, and 1Sl25x) and five y-type (1Sl2y, 1Sl6y1, 1Sl16y, 1Sl17y, and 1Sl23y) from Aegilops longissima L. (SlSl, 2n = 2x = 14) were identified, and their complete encoding genes were cloned by allelic-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). The deduced amino acid (aa) residues of the x-type subunit genes ranged from 821 aa (2469 bp) to 941 aa (2829 bp), while those of the y-type subunit genes varied from 749 aa (2250 bp) to 771 aa (2361 bp). These special HMW-GS had a longer central repetitive domain with more glutamine repeats and glutamine residues compared to the previously characterized HMW-GS in common wheat, which provided a structural basis for superior gluten quality formation. The authenticity of the four cloned genes were verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF–MS). Abundant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and insertion/deletion (InDel) variations among these genes were identified, which would benefit for developing specific molecular markers used for wheat gluten quality improvement. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 1Sl-encoded HMW-GS had close relationships with those from bread wheat, which were divergent from Triticum species at 2.10–10.00 million years ago. Our results indicate that the 1Sl genome contains superior candidate glutenin genes that have potential application values for the improvement of wheat bread making quality.

Keywords

Aegilops longissima L. HMW-GS AS-PCR MALDI-TOF/TOF–MS Phylogenetics Gluten quality 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was financially supported by Grants from National Key R & D Program of China (2016YFD0100502) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31771773).

Supplementary material

13205_2019_1803_MOESM1_ESM.docx (23 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 22 kb) Table S1 Estimation of divergence time (MYA) between 5 new x-type genes and 20 related genes in Ae. longissima. Table S2 Estimation of divergence time (MYA) between 5 new y-type genes and 22 related genes in Ae. longissima.

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Copyright information

© King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Life ScienceCapital Normal University, BeijingBeijingChina
  2. 2.Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain Industry (HCICGI)Yangtze UniversityJingzhouChina

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