Advertisement

Tree rings-width study of western Himalaya and its linkage with boreal spring vapor pressure and wet-day frequency

  • Somaru RamEmail author
  • H. N. Singh
  • Ramesh Kumar Yadav
  • Manoj K. Srivastava
Original Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Tree ring chronologies from different sites of hill forest in the western Himalaya of India have been carried out in relation to natural climate variability/change. The first principal component (PC1) prepared by using a multiple site tree ring-width chronologies of the western Himalaya is strongly negatively correlated with vapor pressure and positively with wet-day frequency. The correlation coefficients of PC1 with boreal spring season vapor pressure and wet-day frequency are − 0.61 and 0.42, respectively, indicating significant level at 0.1%. The relationship indicated that wet-day frequency and vapor pressure of the western Himalaya have significant role in modulating tree growth patterns during boreal spring season (March to May). The results indicate that increasing vapor pressure during boreal spring season may cause high transpiration and evaporation, which results in moisture stress condition over the region and has adverse impact on trees growth.

Keywords

Tree ring width Wet-day frequency Vapor pressure Western Himalaya 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are extremely grateful to Prof. Ravi Nanjundiah, Director, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, and Dr. R. Krishnan, the executive director of CCCR, IITM, Pune, India, for encouragement and providing necessary facilities. The authors gratefully acknowledge Dr. H.P. Borgaonkar (IITM) for his kind help of tree ring data. Also, the authors are thankful to India Water Portal for making available climatic data on the Web site. The authors are also thankful to two anonymous reviewers for their useful suggestion and helpful comments to improve the manuscript.

References

  1. Biondi F, Waikul K (2004) Dendroclim2002: a C++ program for statistical calibration of climate signals in tree-ring chronologies. Comput Geosci 30:303–311CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Borgaonkar HP, Pant GB, Rupa Kumar K (1994) Dendroclimatic reconstruction of summer precipitation of Srinagar, Kashmir, India since the late 18th century. Holocene 4:299–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Borgaonkar HP, Pant GB, Rupa Kumar K (1999) Tree-ring chronologies from western Himalaya and their dendroclimatic potential. IAWA J 20(3):295–309CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Borgaonkar HP, Ram S, Sikder AB (2009) Assessment of tree-ring analysis of high-elevation Cedrus deodara D. Don from western Himalaya (India) in relation to climate and glacier fluctuations. Dendrochronologia 27:59–69CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cook ER, Meko DM, Stahle DW, Cleaveland MK (1999) Drought reconstructions for the continental United States. J Clim 12:1145–1162CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cook ER, Anchukaitis KJ, Buckley BM, D’Arrigo RD, Jacoby GC, Wright WE (2010) Asian monsoon failure and megadrought during the last millennium. Science 328:486–489CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hughes MK (1992) Dendroclimatic evidence from the western Himalaya. In: Bradley RS, Jones PD (eds) Climate since AD 1500. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  8. Massmann A, Gentine P, Lin C (2018) When does vapor pressure deficit drive or reduce evapotranspiration? Hydrol Earth Syst Sci Discuss.  https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2018-553 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ram S (2012) Tree growth–climate relationships of conifer trees and reconstruction of summer Palmer drought severity index at Pahalgam in Srinagar, India. Quat Int 254:152–158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ram S (2018) Tree ring-width variations over western Himalaya in India and its linkage with heat and aridity indices. Nat Hazards 92:635–645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP (2013) Growth response of conifer trees from high altitude region of western Himalaya. Curr Sci 105(2):225–231Google Scholar
  12. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP (2014a) Tree-ring analysis over the western Himalaya and its long-term association with vapor pressure and potential evapotranspiration. Dendrochronologia 32:32–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP (2014b) Climatic response of various tree ring parameters of fir (Abies pindrow) from Chandanwani in Jammu and Kashmir, western Himalaya, India. Curr Sci 106(11):1568–1576Google Scholar
  14. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP (2016) Reconstruction of heat index based on tree-ring width records of western Himalaya in India. Dendrochronologia 40:64–71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP (2017) Moisture index during the last two centuries inferred from tree growth in the western Himalaya. Curr Sci 112(12):2453–2455CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Ram S, Borgaonkar HP, Nandargi SS (2017) Western Himalaya trees growth study and its association with droughts in India: a case study. Glob J Bot Sci 5:33–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Ram S, Singh HN, Yadva RK, Srivastava MK (2018) Climatic response of Cedrus deodara tree-ring width records from Jangla region of western Himalaya in India: a case study. J Indian Geophys Union 22(6):632–639Google Scholar
  18. Singh J, Yadav RR (2000) Tree-ring indications of recent glacier fluctuations in Gangotri, western Himalaya. Curr Sci 79:1598–1601Google Scholar
  19. Singh J, Yadav RR (2005) Spring precipitation variations over the western Himalaya, India, since A.D. 1731 as deduced from tree-rings. J Geophys Res.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2004jd004855 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Singh J, Yadav RR, Dubey B, Chaturvedi R (2004) Millennium-long ring width chronology of Himalayan cedar from Garhwal Himalaya and its potential in climate change studies. Curr Sci 86(4):590–593Google Scholar
  21. Singh J, Yadav RR, Wilmking M (2009) A 694-year tree-ring based rainfall reconstruction from Himachal Pradesh, India. Clim Dyn.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00382-09-0528-5 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Singh V, Yadav RR, Gupta AK, Kotlia BS, Singh J, Yadav AK, Singh AK, Misra KG (2017) Tree-ring droughts records from Kishtwar, Jammu and Kashmir, northwest Himalaya, India. Quat Int 444:53–64CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Tian H, Banger K, Bo T, Dadhwal VK (2014) History of land use in India during 1880–2010: large-scale land transformations reconstructed from satellite data and historical archives. Glob Planet Change 121:78–88CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Wigley TML, Briffa KR, Jones PD (1984) On the average value of correlated time series, with applications in dendroclimatology and hydrometeorology. J Clim Appl Meteorol 23:201–213CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Yadav RR (2009) Tree-ring imprints of long-term changes in climate in western Himalaya, India. J Biosci 34(5):699–707CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Yadav RR, Singh J (2002) Tree-ring based spring temperature patterns over the past four centuries in western Himalaya. Quat Res 57:299–305CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Yadav RR, Park WK, Singh J, Dubey B (2004) Do the western Himalaya defy global warming. Geophys Res Lett 31:L17201.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2004GL020201 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Yadav RR, Misra KG, Yadava AK, Kotlia BS, Misra S (2015) Tree-ring footprint of drought variability in last 300 years over Kumaun Himalaya, India and its association with crop productivity. Quat Sci Rev 117:113–123CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Wood Science 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Somaru Ram
    • 1
    Email author
  • H. N. Singh
    • 1
  • Ramesh Kumar Yadav
    • 1
  • Manoj K. Srivastava
    • 2
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Tropical MeteorologyPuneIndia
  2. 2.Department of GeophysicsBanaras Hindu UniversityVaranasiIndia

Personalised recommendations