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Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 379–383 | Cite as

Spontaneous rotation of the monorail-type guide extension support catheter during advancement of a curved guiding catheter: the potential hazard of twisting with the coronary guidewire

  • Sho Hashimoto
  • Akihiko Takahashi
  • Takeshi Yamada
  • Yukio Mizuguchi
  • Norimasa Taniguchi
  • Tetsuya Hata
  • Shunsuke Nakajima
Original Article
  • 84 Downloads

Abstract

The extension support guiding catheter has been used to perform complex percutaneous coronary intervention to increase back-up support for the guiding catheter or to ensure deep intubation for device delivery. However, because of its monorail design, advancement of the stent into the distal extension tubing segment is sometimes problematic. Although this problem is considered due to simple collision of the stent, operators have observed tangling between a monorail extension catheter and coronary guidewire in some patients. To examine movement of the collar of the extension guide catheter during advancement of the guiding catheter, we set up an in vitro model in which the guiding catheter had two curves. Rotation of the extension guide catheter was examined by both fluoroscopic imaging and movement of the hub of the proximal end of the catheter. During advancement in the first curve, the collar moved toward the outer side of the curve of the guiding catheter as the operator pushed the shaft of the extension guiding catheter, which overrode the guidewire. After crossing the first curve, the collar moved again to the outer side of the second curve (the inner side of the first curve) of the mother catheter, and then, another clockwise rotation was observed in the proximal hub. Consequently, the collar and tubing portion of the extension guide catheter rotated 360° around the coronary guidewire, and the monorail extension catheter and guidewire became tangled. There is a potential risk of unintentional twisting with the guidewire during advancement into the curved guiding catheter because of its monorail design.

Keywords

Monorail extension catheter Twisting Stent delivery 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Disclosure

The authors declare no financial relationships or conflicts of interest regarding the content herein.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Statement of human rights

The study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards of the Sakurakai Takahashi Hospital Institutional Review Board and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments.

Informed consent

The patient gave his written informed consent to publish his case and accompanying images.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sho Hashimoto
    • 1
  • Akihiko Takahashi
    • 1
  • Takeshi Yamada
    • 1
  • Yukio Mizuguchi
    • 1
  • Norimasa Taniguchi
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Hata
    • 1
  • Shunsuke Nakajima
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CardiologySakurakai Takahashi HospitalKobeJapan

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