Advertisement

Journal of Crop Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 451–457 | Cite as

Performance Evaluation of Malt Barley: from Malting Quality and Breeding Perspective

  • Tazebchew AsresEmail author
  • Daniel Tadesse
  • Tesfaye Wossen
  • Assefa Sintayehu
Research Article
  • 10 Downloads

Abstract

Lack of suitable malt barley varieties that exhibit high yielding, stable performance, and good malting quality is the major factor among several production constraints contributing to low productivity of malt barley in the North Gondar Zone. The present study was done to evaluate and recommend the best performing varieties in the major potential areas of North Gondar. The experiment was conducted at three locations for two consecutive years (2015 and 2016) during the main cropping season using twelve improved varieties. The design was randomized complete block design with three replications. Analysis of variance and GGE [genotype main effect (G) and genotype-by-environment interaction (GE)] biplot analysis were conducted following their respective procedures. Combined analysis of variance revealed a highly significant difference (P < 0.01) among genotypes, environments, and genotype-by-environment interaction for grain yield, most agronomic and malt quality traits. All the varieties had acceptable malt quality traits. The variety IBON-174/03 was found to be the highest yielding and the most stable variety across environments. According to the polygon view of biplot analysis, the varieties were spread across four sections and the test environments spread across two sections. Among the six test environments, D and C were more discriminating and F and B were less discriminating. Test environments F, E, and A were found to be more representative of the mega-environment than D. Considering early maturity, malt quality, grain yield, and stability performance; it is recommended to use the variety IBON-174/03 for production in the study areas and in similar areas.

Key words

Genotype-by-environment interaction genotype main effect and genotype by environment interaction biplot malt barley malt quality yield stability variety 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bayeh M, Berhane L. 2011. Barley research and development in Ethiopia–an overview. In: Mulatu B, Grando S, eds, Barley Research and Development in Ethiopia. Proceedings of the 2nd National Barley Research and Development Review Workshop. 28–30 November 2006, HARC, Holetta, Ethiopia. ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, pp 1–16Google Scholar
  2. Berhane L, Hailu G, Fikadu A. 1996. Barley production and research. In: Hailu Gebre and Joob Van Luer, eds, Barley Research in Ethiopia: Past work and future prospects. Proceeding of the first barley research review workshop. 16–19 October 1993, Addis Ababa, IAR/ICARDA. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, pp 1–8Google Scholar
  3. Biadge K, Yadesa A. 2017. Malt quality profile of malt barley varieties grown in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia. Int. J. Bioorganic Chem. 2: 130–134Google Scholar
  4. Central Statistical Agency. 2017/18. Agricultural Sample survey. Report on area and production of major crops. Statistical Bulletin 586, Volume I, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaGoogle Scholar
  5. Daniel TK. 2010. Genetic Variation of Malt Barley Genotypes in their Yield and N–use Efficiency. MSc. Thesis. Bahir Dar University, EthiopiaGoogle Scholar
  6. Emebiria L, Moodya D, Panozzoa JF, Readb J. 2003. Mapping of QTL for malting quality attributes in barley based on a cross of parents with low grain protein concentration. Department of Primary Industrious, Reserch and Development Division, Natimuk Road, Privet Bag 260, Horsham, Vic.3401, AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  7. Fasika T. 2014. Assela Malt Factory to suspend production. Adiss Fortune, Adiss Ababa, EthiopiaGoogle Scholar
  8. Finlay K, Wilkinson G. 1963. The analysis of adaptation in plant breeding programme. Aus. J. Agri. Res. 14: 742–754CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Gabriel, KR. 1971. The biplot graphic display of matrices with application to principal component analysis. Biometrika 58: 453–467CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gauch HG, Zobel RW. 1997. Identifying mega–environments and targeting genotypes. Crop Sci. 37: 311–326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Getachew L, Tolosa A, Tesyaye Z. 2011. Unexploited opportunity in agro–processing: The case of malt barley in Ethiopia. In: Mulatu B, Grando S, eds, Barley Research and Development in Ethiopia. Proceedings of the 2nd National Barley Research and Development Review Workshop. 28–30 November 2006, HARC, Holetta, Ethiopia. ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, pp 339–350Google Scholar
  12. Gomez KA, Gomez AA. 1984. Statistical Procedures for Agricultural Research, 2nd edn. John Wiley and Sons, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  13. Kaya Y, Akcura M, Taner S. 2006. GGE–biplot analysis of multienvironment yield trials in bread wheat. Turk. J. Agric. 30: 325–337Google Scholar
  14. Kemelew M. 2011. Opportunities and challenges in malt barley research and production in North Shewa of the Amhara Region. In: Mulatu B, and Grando S, eds, Barley Research and Development in Ethiopia. Proceedings of the 2nd National Barley Research and Development Review Workshop. 28–30 November 2006, HARC, Holetta, Ethiopia. ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, pp 73–76Google Scholar
  15. Moral LFG, Miralles DJ, Slafer GA. 2002. Initiation and appearance of vegetative and reproductive structures throughout barley development, In Slafer G, eds, Barley Science: Recent Advances from Molecular Biology to Agronomy of Yield and Quality, ED 2, Vol 3. Food Products Press, New York, London, Oxford, pp 243–268Google Scholar
  16. Mulatu B, Grando S. 2011. Barley Research and Development in Ethiopia. Proceeding of the 2nd National Barley Research and Development Review Workshop. 28–30 November 2006, HARC, Holetta, Ethiopia. ICARDA, Aleppo, SyriaGoogle Scholar
  17. Muez M, Sentayehu A, Berhane L, Haddis Y, Mizan T. 2014. Parametric stability analysis of malt barley genotypes for grain yield in Tigray, Ethiopia. World J. Agric. Sci. 10: 210–215Google Scholar
  18. Muluken B. 2013. Study on malting barley genotypes under diverse Agroecologies of northwestern Ethiopia. Afr. J. Plant Sci. 7: 548–557CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Simmonds N. 1981. Genotype (G), environment (E), and GE components of crop yields. Expl. Agric. 17: 355–362CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Tadese K. 2011. Malting barley marketing and malt production from barley in Ethiopia In: Mulatu B, Grando S, eds, Barley Research and Development in Ethiopia. Proceedings of the 2nd National Barley Research and Development Review Workshop. 28–30 November 2006, HARC, Holetta, Ethiopia. ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, pp 327–337Google Scholar
  21. Tura K, Gashaw G. 2015. Review of barley value chain management in Ethiopia. J. Biol.Agric. Healthcare 5: 84–97Google Scholar
  22. Yan W. 2001. GGEBiplot―A Windows application forgraphical analysis of multi–environment trial data and other types of two–way data. Agron. J. 93: 1111–1118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Yan W, Hunt LA, Sheng Q, Szlavnics Z. 2000. Cultivar evaluation and mega–environment investigation based on GGE biplot. Crop Sci. 40: 596–605CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Yan W, Kang MS. 2003. GGE biplot analysis: a graphical tool for breeders, Geneticists, and Agronomist. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FLGoogle Scholar
  25. Yan W, Kang MS, Ma B, Woods S, Cornelius PL. 2007. GGE biplot vs. AMMI analysis of genotype–by–environment data. Crop Sci. 47: 641–653Google Scholar
  26. Yan W, Rajcan I. 2002. Biplot evaluation of test sites and trait relations of soybean in Ontario. Crop Sci. 42: 11–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Yan W, Tinker NA. 2006. Biplo analysis of mulit–environment trial data: Principles and applications. Can. J. Plant Sci. 86: 623–645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Yetsedaw A, Tadesse D, Wondimu B. 2013. Participatory evaluation of malt barley (Hordeum ulgare L.) genotypes for yield and other agronomic traits at North–West Ethiopia. Wudpecker J. Agric. 2: 218–222Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Korean Society of Crop Science (KSCS) and Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tazebchew Asres
    • 1
    Email author
  • Daniel Tadesse
    • 1
  • Tesfaye Wossen
    • 1
  • Assefa Sintayehu
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GondarGondarEthiopia

Personalised recommendations