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Neurotoxicity Research

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 515–522 | Cite as

Association of the Polygenic Risk Score with the Incidence Risk of Parkinson’s Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid α-Synuclein in a Chinese Cohort

  • Wei-Wei Li
  • Dong-Yu Fan
  • Ying-Ying Shen
  • Fa-Ying Zhou
  • Yang Chen
  • Ye-Ran Wang
  • Heng Yang
  • Jing Mei
  • Ling Li
  • Zhi-Qiang XuEmail author
  • Yan-Jiang WangEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is attributed to interactions among genes and environmental and lifestyle factors, but the genetic architecture of PD is complex and not completely understood. To evaluate whether the genetic profile modifies PD development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathological biomarkers, we enrolled 418 PD patients and 426 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Forty-six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were reported to be significantly associated with PD in large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs) were genotyped and analysed. The alleles associated with PD were used to build polygenic risk score (PRS) models to represent polygenic risk. The Cox proportional hazards model and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to evaluate the prediction value of the PRS for PD risk and age at onset. The CSF α-synuclein levels were measured in a subgroup of control subjects (n = 262), and its relationship with the PRS was analysed. We found that some SNPs identified from other populations had significant correlations with PD in our Chinese cohort. The PRS we built had prediction value for PD risk and age at onset. The CSF α-synuclein level had no correlation with the PRS in normal subjects.

Keywords

Parkinson’s disease Single nucleotide polymorphisms Polygenic risk score CSF biomarker α-Synuclein 

Notes

Funding Information

This work was supported by the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology (grant no. 2016YFC1306401).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Daping Hospital, and all subjects and their caregivers provided informed consent.

Competing Interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Supplementary material

12640_2019_66_MOESM1_ESM.docx (89 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 89 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei-Wei Li
    • 1
  • Dong-Yu Fan
    • 1
  • Ying-Ying Shen
    • 1
  • Fa-Ying Zhou
    • 1
  • Yang Chen
    • 1
  • Ye-Ran Wang
    • 1
  • Heng Yang
    • 1
  • Jing Mei
    • 1
  • Ling Li
    • 1
  • Zhi-Qiang Xu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yan-Jiang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and Centre for Clinical Neuroscience, Daping HospitalThird Military Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined InjuryThird Military Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  3. 3.Centre for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence TechnologyChinese Academy of ScienceBeijingChina

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