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Detections of gastrointestinal parasites, including Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp., in cattle of Banten province, Indonesia

  • Dyah Haryuningtyas Sawitri
  • April Hari WardhanaEmail author
  • Eny Martindah
  • Fitrine Ekawasti
  • Dias Aprita Dewi
  • Bambang Ngaji Utomo
  • Tomoyuki Shibahara
  • Masahiro Kusumoto
  • Masaharu Tokoro
  • Kazumi Sasai
  • Makoto MatsubayashiEmail author
Original Article
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Abstract

Gastrointestinal parasites can induce low productivity in livestock by causing acute or chronic enteritis. Veterinarians make great efforts to design rational and effective hygienic protocols for both the prevention and treatment of diarrhea. Although prevalences can vary depending on the examined areas or the ages of the hosts, and the methods used for detections, it is helpful to accumulate data across many areas to evaluate parasitic distribution. A coprological survey in cattle was conducted in Tangerang, Banten Province of Indonesia, in order to determine the prevalence of the parasites, including those of diarrhea-associated diseases. Furthermore, the risk of transmission of Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. to human was genetically analyzed. Gastrointestinal parasites were detected in 87 of 109 cattle samples, including 85 carrying Eimeria spp., 36 carrying Fasciola gigantica, 35 carrying Strongyloides spp., 33 carrying Paramphistomum spp., and 15 carrying Capillaria spp. Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp., parasites with zoonotic potential, were detected in 9 and 1 cattle samples, respectively. Molecular analyses identified the G. intestinalis isolate as a member of Assemblage E, which has been recently detected in humans in another country. These results may be helpful in understanding the hygienic risk affecting the livestock productivity and zoonotic potential of cattle in Indonesia.

Keywords

Assemblage E Cryptosporidium Giardia intestinalis Indonesia, Tangerang 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge Mrs. Rika Sekiguchi and Mrs. Noriko Asama for helping with the fecal and molecular examinations. This study was supported, in part, by a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) (Grant No. 16H05803).

Author’s contribution

SDH, WAH, ME, EF, DDA, and MM collected the fecal samples, examined the parasites, and summarized the results and information of the farm. WAH and UBN organized the survey at the examined areas. ST, KM, SK, and MM performed molecular analyses of the parasites. SDH, TM, and MM mainly provided the manuscript. SDH, TM, WAH and MM equally contributed in the manuscript writing. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The research work was conducted under the Indonesian Research Center for Veterinary Science, Bogor, Indonesia. The handling of animals in the study was approved by the ethics committee of Indonesia Agency for Agricultural Research and Development, Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia (No. Balitbangtan/BB Litvet/AT_HL/01.01/2017).

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dyah Haryuningtyas Sawitri
    • 1
  • April Hari Wardhana
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Eny Martindah
    • 1
  • Fitrine Ekawasti
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dias Aprita Dewi
    • 1
  • Bambang Ngaji Utomo
    • 1
  • Tomoyuki Shibahara
    • 2
    • 4
  • Masahiro Kusumoto
    • 3
  • Masaharu Tokoro
    • 5
  • Kazumi Sasai
    • 2
    • 6
  • Makoto Matsubayashi
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Indonesian Research Center for Veterinary ScienceBogorIndonesia
  2. 2.Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental SciencesOsaka Prefecture UniversityOsakaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAirlangga UniversitySurabayaIndonesia
  4. 4.National Institute of Animal Health, NAROTsukubaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  6. 6.Asian Health Science Research Institute, Osaka Prefecture UniversityOsakaJapan

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