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Journal of Parasitic Diseases

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 560–565 | Cite as

Genotyping of human Echinococcus granulosus cyst in Morocco

  • Sara TahiriEmail author
  • Hafida Naoui
  • Mariem Iken
  • Souad Azelmat
  • Mehdi Khallayoune
  • Mourad Bouchrik
  • Badre Eddine Lmimouni
Original Article
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

Echinococcus granulosus is the etiological agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE), also commonly called hydatidosis. This is a zoonotic infection endemic worldwide, including the Mediterranean basin and Morocco. The genetic variability of Echinococcus granulosus is known to influence development of parasitic cysts in different intermediate hosts, and therefore the epidemiology of infection. Molecular studies have identified nine genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus, eight of them affect humans, grouped today in four distinct species. In Morocco, molecular studies on CE cysts from animals showed the presence, for the large majority of cases, of the G1 genotype (« sheep strain » or Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto), which is also the cause of the majority of human infections worldwide, and to a lesser extent of the other genotypes (G2 and G3) within Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto complex. However, so far no genotyping of echinococcal cysts in Morocco has been carried out. We collected CE cysts material from 15 patients diagnosed with abdominal CE in the Meknès-Tafilalt region, Middle Atlas of Morocco, and an endemic area and genotyped by multiplex PCR. The only five cysts from which it was possible to successfully amplify the DNA were all belonging to the G1–G3 genotype, in line with the epidemiology of CE in animals in the same area. Our results add new information, on the human side, to the epidemiological picture of CE in the region, which are important in the context of any control plan for the infection.

Keywords

Echinococcus granulosus Genotypes G1–G3 complex Cystic echinococcosis Morocco 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara Tahiri
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hafida Naoui
    • 1
  • Mariem Iken
    • 1
  • Souad Azelmat
    • 1
  • Mehdi Khallayoune
    • 1
  • Mourad Bouchrik
    • 1
  • Badre Eddine Lmimouni
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie RabatUniversite Mohammed V de RabatRabatMorocco

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