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Flawed analytical method used for reference glucose

  • George CembrowskiEmail author
Correspondence

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None declared.

Editorial responsibility

This submission was handled by Dr. Hilary P. Grocott, Editor-in-Chief, Canadian Journal of Anesthesia.

Funding

None.

An honorarium was received from LifeScan for the rewriting of a Diabetes Educator review of how to assess whole blood glucose meter performance. No other funds have been received in the last two years from any diagnostic company.

References

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    Nakadate Y, Sato H, Roque P, et al. Accuracy of blood glucose measurements using the NOVA StatStrip® glucometer during cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study. Can J Anesth 2019. DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12630-019-01350-7.
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    Musholt PB, Schipper C, Thomé N, et al. Dynamic electrochemistry corrects for hematocrit interference on blood glucose determinations with patient self-measurement devices. J Diabetes Sci Technol 2011; 5: 1167-75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Cembrowski GS, Xu Q, Cembrowski AR, Mei J, Sadrzadeh H. Impaired clinical utility of sequential patient GEM blood gas measurements associated with calibration schedule. Clin Biochem 2017; 50: 936-41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kattar M, Xu Q, Cembrowski A, Mei J, Sadrzadeh H, Cembrowski GS. Reduced accuracy of GEM 4000 for measurement of electrolytes, glucose, and hemoglobin in relation to calibration schedule. Am J Clin Pathol 2018; 149(Suppl 1): S8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Liang Y, Wanderer J, Nichols JH, Klonoff D, Rice MJ. Blood gas analyzer accuracy of glucose measurements. Mayo Clin Proc 2017; 92: 1030-41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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