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Combined Effect of Osteoporosis and Poor Dynamic Balance on the Incidence of Sarcopenia in Elderly Chinese Community Suburban-Dwelling Individuals

  • X. Yu
  • L. Hou
  • J. Guo
  • Y. Wang
  • P. Han
  • L. Fu
  • P. Song
  • X. Chen
  • H. Yu
  • Y. Zhang
  • L. Wang
  • W. Zhang
  • X. Zhu
  • F. Yang
  • Qi GuoEmail author
Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Objectives

Given the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis and the important role dynamic balanced plays in the assessment of muscle function, we aimed to examine the joint and separate effects of osteoporosis and poor dynamic balance on the incidence of sarcopenia in Chinese elderly individuals.

Design

This study was conducted on 658 (44.4% male) Chinese suburban-dwelling participants with a mean age of 68.42 ± 5.43 years who initially had no sarcopenia and were aged >60 years. A quantitative ultrasound scan of each participant’s calcaneus with a T score less than −2.5 was used to identify the prevalence of osteoporosis. Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria. We assessed dynamic balance using the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT). Participants who scored in the top 20% on the TUGT were defined as having poor dynamic balance.

Results

After a follow-up of three years, the incidence of sarcopenia in the general population was 8.1% (9.6% in males, 6.8% in females). The incidence of sarcopenia was progressively greater in people suffering from both osteoporosis and poor dynamic balance (OR=2.416, 95%CI=1.124–5.195) compared to those who only had osteoporosis (OR=0.797, 95%CI=0.378–1.682) or poor dynamic balance (OR=1.226, 95%CI=0.447–3.363) in models without adjustments. Even after adjusting for potential confounders, the result still held true (OR=2.431, 95%CI=1.053–5.614).

Conclusions

In our study, we found individuals who suffered from both osteoporosis and poor dynamic balance simultaneously had a significantly higher incidence of sarcopenia than those who suffered from either one or the other.

Key words

Dynamic balancee elder people osteoporosis sarcopenia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Guiyan Shao from the Chadian public health center and Xiaofang Ren from Hangu welfare house for providing place and organization.

Funding: This work was supported by grant from National Natural Science Foundation of China (81601952) and Tianjin Municipal Science and Technology Commission (16ZXMJSY00070, Tianjin, China), and Health and Family Planning Commission of Binhai New Area (2017BWKZ005).

Ethics approval and consent to participate: This research was approved by the Ethics Committee at Tianjin Medical University. The methodological sessions were carried out in accordance with the approved guidelines and regulations. The participants were fully informed of the nature of research and signed an informed consent to participate.

Competing interests: The authors declare that they have no competing interests in this section.

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Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer-Verlag International SAS, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • X. Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Hou
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Guo
    • 3
  • Y. Wang
    • 3
  • P. Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Fu
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • X. Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Zhang
    • 2
  • X. Zhu
    • 4
  • F. Yang
    • 2
  • Qi Guo
    • 5
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, TEDA International Cardiovascular HospitalCardiovascular Clinical College of Tianjin Medical UniversityTianjinChina
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineTianjin Medical UniversityTianjinChina
  3. 3.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineCnooc General HospitalTianjinChina
  4. 4.Department of Neurology, Tianjin Neurological InstituteTianjin Medical University General HospitalTianjinChina
  5. 5.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineShanghai University of Medicine and Health SciencesShanghaiChina

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