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Phase Angle is a Useful Indicator for Muscle Function in Older Adults

  • Minoru YamadaEmail author
  • Y. Kimura
  • D. Ishiyama
  • N. Nishio
  • Y. Otobe
  • T. Tanaka
  • S. Ohji
  • S. Koyama
  • A. Sato
  • M. Suzuki
  • H. Ogawa
  • T. Ichikawa
  • D. Ito
  • H. Arai
Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Aim

Phase angle (PhA) can be determined through bioelectrical impedance analysis and is a unique variable for skeletal muscle. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between PhA and muscle mass/quality in older adults. In addition, we attempted to determine the cutoff value of PhA for poor muscle function.

Methods

Community-dwelling Japanese older men (n=285, 81.1±7.1 years) and women (n=724, 80.4±6.8 years) participated in this study and were classified into four groups based on the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (normal, presarcopenia, dynapenia, and sarcopenia). We measured PhA using bioelectrical impedance analysis, muscle quantity and quality indicators using ultrasonography, muscle strength, and physical performance and compared them in four groups. We also tried to determine the cutoff value of PhA for poor muscle function.

Results

We found a significant difference in PhA among the four groups in men (P<0.05), and the dynapenia (3.61±0.75°) and sarcopenia groups (3.40±0.74°) showed significantly lower values than the normal group (4.50±0.86°) (P<0.05), but not the presarcopenia group (4.12±0.85°). In women, a significant difference was also observed among the four groups (P<0.05), and the dynapenia (3.41±0.65°) and sarcopenia groups (3.31±0.66°) showed significantly lower measures than the normal group (4.14±0.71°) (P<0.05), but not the presarcopenia group (4.07±0.51°). The receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis indicated the best cutoff value of PhA (men: 4.05°, women: 3.55°) to discriminate sarcopenia and dynapenia from normal and presarcopenia.

Conclusion

These findings suggest that PhA is a useful indicator for muscle function.

Key words

Bioelectrical impedance dynapenia older adults phase angle sarcopenia 

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Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minoru Yamada
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Y. Kimura
    • 1
  • D. Ishiyama
    • 1
  • N. Nishio
    • 1
  • Y. Otobe
    • 1
  • T. Tanaka
    • 1
  • S. Ohji
    • 1
  • S. Koyama
    • 1
  • A. Sato
    • 1
  • M. Suzuki
    • 1
  • H. Ogawa
    • 1
  • T. Ichikawa
    • 1
  • D. Ito
    • 1
  • H. Arai
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Comprehensive Human SciencesUniversity of TsukubaTokyoJapan
  2. 2.National Center for Geriatrics and GerontologyAichiJapan

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