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Anatomical Science International

, Volume 94, Issue 1, pp 67–74 | Cite as

Anatomical investigations of the tongue and laryngeal entrance of the Egyptian laughing dove Spilopelia senegalensis aegyptiaca in Egypt

  • Mohamed M. A. AbumandourEmail author
  • Neveen E. R. El-Bakary
Original Article

Abstract

In the present work, the first full anatomical description of the tongue and laryngeal entrance of the Egyptian laughing dove Spilopelia senegalensis aegyptiaca, which was obtained with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histological techniques, is provided. The lingual apex was rounded and the cranially convex papillary crest exhibited a transverse papillary row, in addition to another row consisting of two giant papillae. Papillae were not observed on the elevated, triangular laryngeal mound except for the glottic opening, which was bounded by two lateral elevated borders that presented a row of small papillae. Two fissures occurred on the laryngeal mound: a rostral fissure at the rostral border of the laryngeal mound, and a caudal fissure that occurred caudally to the glottic opening and continued caudally as the laryngeal fissure. SEM analysis showed filiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the apex and body, and indicated that each giant papilla was long with a pointed apex and exhibited one or two secondary papillae on its surface. The dorsal surface of the lingual root exhibited numerous openings of the lingual salivary glands. The caudal part of the laryngeal mound presented numerous openings of the laryngeal salivary glands. Histologically, the dorsal surface of the anterior and middle lingual part was covered with a thick and stratified squamous epithelium. The anterior and middle lingual part presented entoglossum cartilaginous ossification of the entoglossal bone, which had numerous chondrocytes lodged within the lacunae of the entoglossum. The lingual glands appeared in the middle and caudal lingual part.

Keywords

Egyptian laughing dove Tongue Glottis Laryngeal mound Papillary crest SEM 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Anatomists 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anatomy and Embryology Department, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAlexandria UniversityBeheraEgypt
  2. 2.Department of Zoology, Faculty of ScienceDamietta UniversityDamiettaEgypt

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