Advertisement

Fisheries Science

, Volume 85, Issue 5, pp 839–845 | Cite as

Evaluation of the thermal tolerances of different strains of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by measuring the effective time required for loss of equilibrium at an approximate upper lethal temperature

  • Toshinao InenoEmail author
  • Koichi Tamaki
  • Kazuya Yamada
  • Ryusuke Kodama
  • Engkong Tan
  • Shigeharu Kinoshita
  • Koji Muto
  • Takashi Yada
  • Shoji Kitamura
  • Shuichi Asakawa
  • Shugo Watabe
Original Article Aquaculture
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

The thermal tolerance phenotypes of different strains of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was investigated in this study. The time at which a fish, acclimated to 17 °C, was no longer able to maintain its equilibrium after reaching the test temperature of 28 °C was recorded as its effective time (ET) in the zone of thermal resistance and used as a parameter of its thermal tolerance. The ET was compared among two strains of rainbow trout, thermally selected and Nikko, and two types of their hybrid progenies (thermally selected male × normal female and thermally selected female × normal male), using 14–15 individuals of each group in tests. Individuals of the thermally selected strain with smaller bodies had a longer ET than those with lager bodies. Five groups of F2 juveniles produced from a full-sibling cross of F1 progenies (Nikko strain females × thermally selected strain males), each containing 40 or 41 individuals, had an ET of 39.3–46.4 min, which was not significantly correlated with body size. Although its ET was influenced by body size, the thermally selected strain showed good thermal tolerance at all body sizes. Moreover, the coefficient of variation of ET was 32–39%, suggesting there was a wide diversity of ET values. Because samples subjected to ET experiments can recover and survive, ET is a promising, convenient indicator to use when examining thermal tolerance phenotypes of large numbers of individuals, which can subsequently provide live individuals with inherited thermal tolerance for use in selective breeding.

Keywords

Effective time Thermally selected strain Nikko strain F2 Thermal tolerance 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by a grant from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries of Japan. We thank Dr. Tsuchida of the Marine Ecology Research Institute Central Laboratory for his valuable advice. We would like to thank Editage (http://www.editage.jp) for English language editing.

References

  1. Cox DK (1974) Effects of three heating rates on the critical thermal maximum of bluegill. In: Gibbons JW, Sharitz RR (eds) Thermal ecology. CONF-730505. Nat. Tech. Inf. Serv, Springfield, pp 158–163Google Scholar
  2. Danzmann RG, Jackson TR, Ferguson MM (1999) Epistasis in allelic expression at upper temperature tolerance QTL in rainbow trout. Aquaculture 173:45–58CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Elliott JM (1981) Some aspects of thermal stress on freshwater teleosts. In: Pickering AD (ed) Stress and fish. Academic Press, London, pp 209–245Google Scholar
  4. Fry FEJ (1947) Effects of the environment on animal activity.University of Toronto studies. Biological series, no. 55. Publications of the Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory, vol 68, pp 1–62Google Scholar
  5. Gjedrem T (2000) Genetic improvement of cold-water fish species. Aquac Res 31:25–33CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hill WG, Mulder HA (2010) Genetic analysis of environmental variation. Genet Res Camb 92:381–395.  https://doi.org/10.1017/S0016672310000546 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ikeguchi K, Ineno T, Itoi S, Kondo H, Kinoshita S, Watabe S (2006) Increased levels of mitochondrial gene transcripts in the thermally selected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) strain during embryonic development. Marine Biotechnol 8:178–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ineno T, Tsuchida S, Kanda M, Watabe S (2005) Thermal tolerance of a rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss strain selected by high-temperature breeding. Fish Sci 71:767–775CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ineno T, Endo M, Watabe S (2008) Differences in self-feeding activity between thermally selected and normal strains of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at high temperatures. Fish Sci 74:372–379CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ineno T, Tamaki K, Yamada K, Kodama R, Tsuchida S, Tan E, Kinoshita S, Muto K, Yada T, Kitamura S, Asakawa S, Watabe S (2018) Thermal tolerance of a thermally selected strain of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the pedigrees of its F1 and F2 generations indicated by their critical thermal maxima. Fish Sci 84:671–679CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Itoi S, Ineno T, Kinoshita S, Hirayama Y, Nakaya M, Kakinuma M, Watabe S (2001) Analysis on serum proteins from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to high temperature. Fish Sci 67:191–193CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Iwama GK, Thomas PT, Forsyth RB, Vijayan MM (1998) Heat shock protein expression in fish. Rev Fish Biol Fish 8:35–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Jackson TR, Ferguson MM, Danzman RG, Fishback AG, Ihssen PE, O’connell M, Crease TJ (1998) Identification of two QTL influencing upper temperature tolerance in three rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) half-sib families. Heredity 80:143–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lund SG, Caissie D, Cunjak RA, Vijayan MM, Tuft BL (2002) The effects of environmental heat stress on heat shock mRNA and protein expression in Miramichi Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 59:1553–1562CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Murray RW (1971) Temperature response. In: Hoar WS, Randall DJ (eds) Fish physiology, vol V. Academic Press, London, pp 121–133Google Scholar
  16. Myrick CA, Cech JJ (2000) Temperature influences on California rainbow trout physiological performance. Fish Physiol Biochem 22(3):245–254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Myrick CA, Cech JJ (2005) Effects of temperature on the growth, food consumption, and thermal tolerance of age-0 Nimbus-strain steelhead. N Am J Aquacult 67:324–330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ojima N, Mekuchi M, Ineno T, Tamaki K, Kera A, Kinoshita S, Asakawa S, Watabe S (2012) Differential expression of heat-shock proteins in F2 offspring from F1 hybrids produced between thermally selected and normal rainbow trout strains. Fish Sci 78:1051–1057CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Perry GML, Danzmann RG, Ferguson MM, Gibson JP (2001) Quantitative trait loci for upper thermal tolerance in outbred strains of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Heredity 86:333–341CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Perry GML, Matyniuk CM, Ferguson MM, Danzmann RG (2005) Genetic parameters for upper thermal tolerance and growth-related traits in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Aquaculture 250(1–2):120–128CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pottinger TG, Carrick TR (1999) Modification of the plasma cortisol response to stress in rainbow trout by selective breeding. Gen Comp Endocrinol 116:122–132CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Recsetar MS, Zeigler MP, Ward DL, Bonar SA, Caldwell CA (2012) Relationship between fish size and upper thermal tolerance. Trans Am Fish Soc 141:1433–1438CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Schindler DW (2001) The cumulative effects of climate warming and other human stresses on Canadian freshwaters in the new millennium. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 58:18–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Tang E, Wongwarangkana C, Kinoshita S, Suzuki Y, Oshima K, Hattori M, Ineno T, Tamaki K, Kera A, Muto K, Yada T, Kitamura S, Asakawa S, Watabe S (2012) Global gene expression analysis of gill tissues from normal and thermally selected strains of rainbow trout. Fish Sci 78:1041–1049CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Fisheries Science 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshinao Ineno
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Koichi Tamaki
    • 2
  • Kazuya Yamada
    • 2
  • Ryusuke Kodama
    • 2
  • Engkong Tan
    • 3
    • 4
  • Shigeharu Kinoshita
    • 4
  • Koji Muto
    • 5
  • Takashi Yada
    • 5
  • Shoji Kitamura
    • 5
  • Shuichi Asakawa
    • 4
  • Shugo Watabe
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.Aquaculture Research Institute, Shingu StationKindai UniversityShinguJapan
  2. 2.Miyazaki Prefectural Fisheries Research Institute Freshwater BranchKobayashiJapan
  3. 3.ACTmed Co., Ltd.ChuoJapan
  4. 4.Laboratory of Aquatic Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoBunkyoJapan
  5. 5.Nikko Station, National Research Institute of AquacultureFisheries Research AgencyTochigiJapan
  6. 6.School of Marine BiosciencesKitasato UniversitySagamiharaJapan

Personalised recommendations